We Philologists Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche, Volume 8

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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THE COMPLETE WORKS OF FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

_First Complete and Authorised English translation in Eighteen Volumes_

EDITED BY

DR OSCAR LEVY

[Illustration: Nietzsche.]

VOLUME EIGHT

* * * * *

THIRD EDITION


WE PHILOLOGISTS

TRANSLATED BY

J. M. KENNEDY

* * * * *

T. N. FOULIS

13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET

EDINBURGH . AND LONDON

1911




CONTENTS


TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE TO "WE PHILOLOGISTS" 105

WE PHILOLOGISTS 109





WE PHILOLOGISTS


AUTUMN 1874

(PUBLISHED POSTHUMOUSLY)


TRANSLATED BY J. M. KENNEDY

AUTHOR OF "THE QUINTESSENCE OF NIETZSCHE," "RELIGIONS AND PHILOSOPHIES
OF THE EAST," &C.


The mussel is crooked inside and rough outside . it is only when we
hear its deep note after blowing into it that we can begin to
esteem it at its true value.--(Ind. Spruche, ed Bothlingk, 1 335)

An ugly-looking-wind instrument . but we must first blow into it.


TRANSLATOR'S INTRODUCTION

The subject of education was one to which Nietzsche, especially during
his residence in Basel, paid considerable attention, and his insight
into it was very much deeper than that of, say, Herbert Spencer or even
Johann Friedrich Herbart, the latter of whom has in late years exercised
considerable influence in scholastic circles. Nietzsche clearly saw that
the "philologists" (using the word chiefly in reference to the teachers
of the classics in German colleges and universities) were absolutely
unfitted for their high task, since they were one and all incapable of
entering into the spirit of antiquity. Although at the first reading,
therefore, this book may seem to be rather fragmentary, there are two
main lines of thought running through it: an incisive criticism of
German professors, and a number of constructive ideas as to what
classical culture really should be.

These scattered aphorisms, indeed, are significant as showing how far
Nietzsche had travelled along the road over which humanity had been
travelling from remote ages, and how greatly he was imbued with the
pagan spirit which he recognised in Goethe and valued in Burckhardt.
Even at this early

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Text Comparison with The Antichrist

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L.
Page 3
In me the stern intellectual conscience that Christianity fosters and makes paramount turns _against_ Christianity.
Page 12
Of all the religions ever devised by the great practical jokers of the race, this is the one that offers most for the least money, so to speak, to the inferior man.
Page 18
It preserves whatever is ripe for destruction; it fights on the side of those disinherited and condemned by life; by maintaining life in so many of the botched of all kinds, it gives life itself a gloomy and dubious aspect.
Page 23
--Looking back, one may almost ask one's self with reason if it was not actually an _aesthetic_ sense that kept men blind so long: what they demanded of the truth was picturesque effectiveness, and of the learned a strong appeal to their senses.
Page 26
As if Renan had a right to be naive! The contrary actually stares one in the face.
Page 28
chief attention are: first, an excessive sensitiveness to sensation, which manifests itself as a refined susceptibility to pain, and _secondly_, an extraordinary spirituality, a too protracted concern with concepts and logical procedures, under the influence of which the instinct of personality has yielded to a notion of the "impersonal.
Page 30
--Hope, in its stronger forms, is a great deal more powerful _stimulans_ to life than any sort of realized joy can ever be.
Page 31
The _first_ thing necessary to its solution is this: that Christianity is to be understood only by examining the soil from which it sprung--it is _not_ a reaction against Jewish instincts; it is their inevitable product; it is simply one more step in the awe-inspiring logic of the Jews.
Page 33
Its Jahveh was an expression of its consciousness of power, its joy in itself, its hopes for itself: to him the Jews looked for victory and salvation and through him they expected nature to give them whatever was necessary to their existence--above all, rain.
Page 34
The whole history of Israel ceased to be of any value: out with it!--These priests accomplished that miracle of falsification of which a great part of the Bible is the documentary evidence; with a degree of contempt unparalleled, and in the face of all tradition and all historical reality, they translated the past of their people into _religious_ terms, which is to say, they converted it into an idiotic mechanism of salvation, whereby all offences against Jahveh were punished and all devotion to him was rewarded.
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--The anarchist and the Christian have the same ancestry.
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60.
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