We Philologists Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche, Volume 8

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...THE COMPLETE WORKS OF FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

_First Complete and Authorised English translation in Eighteen Volumes_

EDITED BY

DR...

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...period of his life Nietzsche was convinced that
Christianity was the real danger to culture; and...

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...sufficiently shown by
observing how few people have any real capacity for their professions
and callings, and...

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...is a slave or a free man, a merchant or a
scholar, his aim in life...

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...age
better by means of antiquity, then our task will be an everlasting
one.--This is the antinomy...

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...do not regard themselves as
individuals: their lives indicate this. The Christian command that
everyone shall steadfastly...

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...touching modesty on the part of mankind. They practically
admit in choosing thus. "We are called...

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...we should do so in order that we
may not be too severe on ourselves.


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He who...

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...would shrink from it horror
stricken. This glorification, then, is spurious; gold-paper.


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The false enthusiasm for antiquity...

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...oh, with what
hatred would they be pursued! But they always humble themselves.

Philology now derives its...

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...and commanding respect: no other science has been
so well favoured. As a general rule all...

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...as to whether higher education ought to be historical
or not; but we may examine the...

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...linguistics brought about the greatest diversion among philologists
themselves, and even the desertion of many of...

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...seek to acquire merely by means of a
detailed plan of study--a plan which, corresponding to...

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...begun earlier than order and peacefulness in the outward
life of the people (enlightenment)."

He then contrasts...

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...our insight into antiquity. First of all, the
culture of antiquity is utilised as an incitement...

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...the
human element which may be seen everywhere and among all peoples, but
among the Greeks it...

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...educational system of a period is condemned, a heavy
censure on philologists is thereby implied: either,...

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...only feels its influence but wishes to
perpetuate it. The same remark applies to a great...

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...with. It is my firm conviction that to have written a single
line which is deemed...

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...however, that
Winckelmann was lacking in the more common talent of philological
criticism, or else he could...

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..."classical
education" is concerned. They, however, who possess the greatest
knowledge of antiquity should likewise possess the...

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...make our
young students known to the ancients: what is worse, it is
unpedagogical; or what can...

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...a secret society who wish to train our
youth by means of the culture of antiquity...

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...should rather turn aside from it . the question of the early
beginnings of the Greeks...

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...strait-laced "poet" depicted the happiness now
experienced by sixty-year-old men.--All pure and simple caricature! So
this is...

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...about that even in all their evil actions they had a dash of purity
about them,...

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...have been much better if the Greeks had been conquered by the
Persians instead of by...

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...must be judged according to the following
standard: the more spirit, the more suffering (as the...

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...require to be too consistent, and
consistency is the last thing Greeks would understand.


125

Almost all the...

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...is, and then we
are glad. This forms part of the obscure philosophy of hate--a
philosophy which...

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...are not deceived. But they play round life with lies:
Simonides advises them to treat life...

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...his
pages, which we admire.


149

In Socrates we have as it were lying open before us a...

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...the
consequence if so and so had not happened?" is almost unanimously thrust
aside, and yet it...

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...seen to go forward in a loose and disordered way, do not
think that a god...

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...fact that
its foundations have become too shaky for us. A criticism of the Greeks
is at...

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...to "worldly things," Christianity preserved the grosser views
of the ancients. All the nobler elements in...

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...participants appear to
be less attractive than ever . how stupid they must be!

Thus the danger...

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...But before we can do this we must first _know_ it!--There is
a thoroughness which is...

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...no longer the treasure-chamber of all knowledge; for
in natural and historical science we have advanced...

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...to _create,_ using the word in a
spiritual sense: states, laws, works of art, &c.

People should...

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...men for the breeding of better men
is the task of the future. The individual must...

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...ourselves may not
come under the influence of the smell of the corpses.


THE DEATH OF THE...

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...denied! This conception has now
become deeper . it is above all a discerning denial, a...

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...intended
to deal with the acquisition of knowledge and its valuation, _e.g._,
history, mathematics, &c. "Material" education,...