Thus Spake Zarathustra: A Book for All and None

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 154

flashes of lightning:--

--Blessed, however, is he who is thus charged! And verily, long must he
hang like a heavy tempest on the mountain, who shall one day kindle the
light of the future!--

Oh, how could I not be ardent for Eternity and for the marriage-ring of
rings--the ring of the return?

Never yet have I found the woman by whom I should like to have children,
unless it be this woman whom I love: for I love thee, O Eternity!

FOR I LOVE THEE, O ETERNITY!

2.

If ever my wrath hath burst graves, shifted landmarks, or rolled old
shattered tables into precipitous depths:

If ever my scorn hath scattered mouldered words to the winds, and if I
have come like a besom to cross-spiders, and as a cleansing wind to old
charnel-houses:

If ever I have sat rejoicing where old Gods lie buried, world-blessing,
world-loving, beside the monuments of old world-maligners:--

--For even churches and Gods'-graves do I love, if only heaven looketh
through their ruined roofs with pure eyes; gladly do I sit like grass
and red poppies on ruined churches--

Oh, how could I not be ardent for Eternity, and for the marriage-ring of
rings--the ring of the return?

Never yet have I found the woman by whom I should like to have children,
unless it be this woman whom I love: for I love thee, O Eternity!

FOR I LOVE THEE, O ETERNITY!

3.

If ever a breath hath come to me of the creative breath, and of the
heavenly necessity which compelleth even chances to dance star-dances:

If ever I have laughed with the laughter of the creative lightning,
to which the long thunder of the deed followeth, grumblingly, but
obediently:

If ever I have played dice with the Gods at the divine table of
the earth, so that the earth quaked and ruptured, and snorted forth
fire-streams:--

--For a divine table is the earth, and trembling with new creative
dictums and dice-casts of the Gods:

Oh, how could I not be ardent for Eternity, and for the marriage-ring of
rings--the ring of the return?

Never yet have I found the woman by whom I should like to have children,
unless it be this woman whom I love: for I love thee, O Eternity!

FOR I LOVE THEE, O ETERNITY!

4.

If ever I have drunk a full draught of the foaming spice- and
confection-bowl in which all things are well mixed:

If ever my hand hath mingled the furthest with the nearest, fire with
spirit, joy with sorrow, and the harshest with the kindest:

If I myself am a grain of the saving salt which maketh everything in

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Text Comparison with The Case of Wagner Complete Works, Volume 8

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In the "Ecce Homo," Nietzsche's autobiography,--a book which.
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statement I made in my preface to "Thoughts out of Season," vol.
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Everything that is good makes me productive.
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"_L'amour_--and with this principle one carries one's point against Gods and men--_est de tous les sentiments le plus égoïste, et par conséquent, lorsqu'il est blessé, le moins généreux"_ (B.
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Or that young hysterics like to be saved by their doctor? (the case in "Lohengrin").
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Let anybody put one of Wagner's "plots" under the microscope, and I wager that he will be forced to laugh.
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Incidentally, I admire the modesty of Christians who go to Bayreuth.
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_Quousque tandem, Crispi_ .
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In the solemn, or fiery, swinging movement, first slow and then quick, of old music--one had to do something quite different; one had to dance.
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11.
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1.
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--This is the antinomy of philology: people have always endeavoured to understand antiquity by means of the present--and shall the present now be understood by-means of antiquity? Better: people have explained antiquity to themselves out of their own experiences; and from the amount of antiquity thus acquired they have assessed the value of their experiences.
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e.
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How was that possible? This point must be studied.
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If a man of distinguished talent appeared, the flock of envious people must have become.
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At the time of Homer, indeed, the nature of the Greek was formed: flippancy of images and imagination was necessary to lighten the weight of its passionate disposition and to set it free.
Page 101
,_ it is based on appearance: we can accept manners, thoughts, and so on through imitation; but imitation can create nothing.