Thoughts Out of Season, Part II

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...THOUGHTS

OUT OF SEASON

PART II


THE USE AND ABUSE OF HISTORY_

SCHOPENHAUER AS EDUCATOR_

By

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

TRANSLATED BY

ADRIAN COLLINS, M.A.

[Illustration]


The...

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...To them alone can
the record of their great forebears be a consolation as well as...

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...here
translated "for others." The _Thoughts out of Season_ are the first
announcement of the complex theme...

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...am trying to represent
something of which the age is rightly proud--its historical
culture--as a fault and...

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...the man's lap. Then he says, "I remember...," and
envies the beast, that forgets at once,...

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...would be the man
without any power to forget, who is condemned to see "becoming"
everywhere. Such...

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...incapable of drawing one round itself, or too selfish to
lose its own view in another's,...

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...behind him, new
sounds are muffled and meaningless; though his perceptions were never
so intimately felt in...

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...he would be cured henceforth of taking history too
seriously, and have learnt to answer the...

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...should
the endless rush of events not bring satiety, surfeit, loathing? So
the boldest of us is...

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...his action and struggle, his conservatism and
reverence, his suffering and his desire for deliverance. These...

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...mortal brains! Through the brains of
sick and short-lived beasts that ever rise to the surface...

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...the differences must be neglected, the
individuality of the past forced into a general formula and...

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...a few
gaily coloured islands of fact rising above it. There is something
beyond nature in the...

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...a reason for continually
rejecting all the nourishing artistic fare that is offered them. For
they do...

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...we are tough folk, and will not be uprooted in the
night." And so, with his...

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...history, that the past itself suffers when history serves
life and is directed by its end....

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...it become too
powerful and invade the territories of the other methods. It only
understands how to...

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...also the resultant of their errors,
passions, and crimes: it is impossible to shake off this...

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...saying what we believe we
see. There is such a star, a bright and lordly star,...

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...that matters to education, and all who see it hope that the
education may not fail...

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...be
misunderstood, as though it were merely a question of the opposition
between barbarism and "fine style."...

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...its absence, any more
than its presence before. One may think the German people to be...

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...men
whose inner life has been drawn from the true path of education, and
uneducated men whose...

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...possesses the rarest of virtues, justice, to a higher
degree than any other time. Thirdly, the...

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...of his fingers
in unravelling the knots. He has lost or destroyed his instinct; he
can no...

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...of the modern man be brought
to the light, and art and religion come as true...

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...concrete. If they have a character of their own, it is so deeply
sunk that it...

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...once emptied of its subjectivity, and come to
what men call an "objective" condition, nothing can...

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...from justice, and really lead to an unhealthy
prejudice in favour of the modern man? Socrates...

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...justice is seldom present, more seldom known,
and almost always mortally hated. On the other hand...

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...two flutes for the
use of dreaming opium-smokers. We can now judge how these virtuosi
stand towards...

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...superstition to say that the picture
given to such a man by the object really shows...

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...historical virtuoso? "It seems
that all human actions and impulses are subordinate to the process of
the...

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...emotion, and the driest
phrase is the correct one. They go so far as to accept...

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...workers who sift and cast together the
material because they can never become great historians. They...

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...of the only atmosphere in which they can live. Historical
justice, even if practised conscientiously, with...

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...forms, and at last becomes the purest, most
transparent, in fact scarcely visible form in the...

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...a protecting cloud. But now men hate to become
ripe, for they honour history above life....

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...only realities." No, such study of history bewilders and
overwhelms. It is not necessary for youth,...

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...lay eggs oftener: but the eggs are always smaller,
though their books are bigger. The natural...

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...that a people's education
need be so extremely historical as it is; the mightiest nations,
mightiest in...

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...the hours of man's life,
thinks the last the most important, that has prophesied the end...

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...from the mediæval _memento mori_ and the
hopelessness that Christianity bears in its heart towards all...

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...far, that is, as we can
regard ourselves as the heirs and followers of the marvellous
classical...

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...rondo,--or rather, as simply superfluous. He has
not said it; and thus he has implanted in...

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...the actual, you would say: "he had spoken everything
that was in him to speak, a...

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...the
motive that ever drives them onward; and even if they are born late,
there is a...

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...he lays the final stone of his knowledge, he
seems to cry aloud to listening Nature:...

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...to combat the excess of historical culture than Hartmann's
parody of the world's history?

If we wished...

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...forward? Or, to ask another
question:--what further has the historically educated fanatic of the
world-process to do,--swimming...

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...uncanny seriousness of an owl," as Goethe has it.
But the world must go forward, the...

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...the future shall prove
to be right,--and no one has despised them with such loathing as
thou,--I...

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...will appear on the theatre of the
future. Are we to continue to work for these...

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...they were accustomed to stand outside the "world," and
cared little for the "process of the...

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... ...

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...the rogue E. von Hartmann tells us.
Though redemption can scarcely be the conscious aim of...

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...time--though a long
time--is needed for a world to perish, so nothing but time--though
still more time--is...

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...but this troublesome
reality of ours is possible. Look through the literature of higher
education in school...

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...veritas_ of
this arrangement was the basis of the new education and the new
state. So the...

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...who will give them this life?

No god and no man will give it--only their own...

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...Must life dominate knowledge, or knowledge
life? Which of the two is the higher, and decisive...

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...and that all ideas and impulses and passions are
massed together in these truisms that cannot...

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...of us: he must organise the chaos in
himself by "thinking himself back" to his true...

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...how
in every little movement of his muscles the man is an individual
self, and further--as an...

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...of "killing their time," and of perishing
with it,--when they wish rather to quicken the time...

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...shell no
more." Also this digging into one's self, this straight, violent
descent into the pit of...

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...more constantly in my youth, and touched me more
nearly, than any other. I wandered then...

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...how badly we moderns compare with the Greeks and Romans, even in
the serious study of...

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...reflection on moral questions that has occupied every great
developed society at all epochs?" There is...

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...the way they
must go.

So I was right in speaking of my "wandering in a world...

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...figure, his slinking or strutting gait. And
again his rough and rather grim soul leads us...

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...has fought. But the joyfulness one
finds here and there in the mediocre writers and limited...

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...the educator and philosopher I had so
long desired. Only, however, in his writings: which was...

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...model
"Schopenhauer the man."

It is no less than a marvel that he should have come to...

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...waste paper. The imminent risk that
his great work would be undone, merely by neglect, bred...

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...the
continual bitterness gives them a threatening and volcanic character.
They take revenge from time to time...

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...not exist
after death, and all our struggle to gain a possession that may
follow us even...

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...to gain
an insight into his personal miseries, and needs, and limitations,
and find out the remedies...

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...the other half there was a gnawing
aspiration, which we can understand, when we hear that...

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...reason": or through the constant search
for the "pros and cons" of things, he may go...

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...their search
after truth, with its single question "What is the real _worth_ of
life?" Empedocles lived...

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...the step-mother's plot to
conceal his genius from him was foiled. And now he could turn...

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...believe in all
seriousness that the world was put right two years ago,[1] and that
all stern...

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...of gold and others of pewter.

How does the philosopher of our time regard culture? Quite
differently,...

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...is wild, primitive and merciless.
One looks on with a chill expectancy, as though into the...

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...dangers, who will provide the
guardians and champions for _Humanity_, for the holy and inviolate
treasure that...

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...of Rousseau's man, so far at any
rate as his hunger for life, his discontent and...

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...really angry, it would be still better."

To speak plainly, it is necessary to become really...

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...and the institutions in which he grew up, he must spare neither
person nor thing, however...

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...into the depths of
being, with a string of curious questions on his lips--"Why am I
alive?...

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...with all their
strength: and there is an evil principle in nature that not one shall
find...

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...ordinary
activity of his own." The objection can be made with apparent reason
against Schopenhauer's man, that...

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...perverted desire of a fool--this is what it means to be
an animal. If universal nature...

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...not to be in a position to
think. The hurry is universal, because every one is...

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...voice with ears that hear. If a man
think of all that Schopenhauer, for example, must...

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...within and without us, to the light, and to strive thereby for
the completion of Nature....

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...our
loves. For we know that culture requires us to make ready for the
coming of the...

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...failure of Nature's handiwork and a testimony to
her larger ideas. "She has succeeded badly," he...

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...find his own aim,--the
production of genius.

Any one who can reach the second step, will see...

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...for the greatest amount of success
and happiness that can be got from his particular stock...

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...the inner side to be judged from the outer. I
sometimes think that modern men are...

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...play the buffoon and the monkey, and learn the arts that
make life amusing. But the...

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...their envy, secretiveness and impurity: he is troubled by
their innate love of the false and...

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...analyse all
things--even the worthiest! To speak honestly, the savant is a
complex of very various impulses...

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...a literary work, for example, by certain paragraphs or
sentences or errors, as he can do...

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...comfort; he listens to everybody's different
thoughts and keeps himself amused all day. He especially chooses
books...

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...pious wish that the impulse may be less
rare in the professor than it seems. For...

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...they can benefit
_themselves_ with the help of culture, but have no thoughts at all
when their...

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...his way is the more
troublesome and dangerous; and they try to entice him over. If...

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...the state, the
superficiality of the business men, and the cold arrogance of the
professors; and I...

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...sad
to have to value art so differently as cause and effect; how huge in
its inception,...

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...does, is sent immediately to Schopenhauer himself;
for who will let a donkey-driver prevent him from...

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...him the first quality of a philosopher--a rude and
strong virility. His father was neither an...

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...the copy and
compendium of the whole world. If a man look at himself through a
veil...

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...man who will reproach him,
as Niebuhr did Plato, with being a bad citizen, may do...

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...essay on
University philosophy. I return to this point, as men must be forced
to take it...

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...banishing him as an
enemy, just as it bans a religion that exalts itself to be...

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...be in his place and appear to be
thinking! What then?

"But," one will say, "he is...

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...It is, of course, not an education in
philosophy at all, but in the art of...

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...secret instinct made them fly from the actual sciences
and found a dim kingdom amid their...

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...in reasoning over their consequences?" The philosophers,
especially in Germany, used to sink into such a...

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...Let the philosophers run
wild, forbid them any thoughts of office or civic position, hold them
out...

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...this kind of compulsion may arouse
from the side of the more reckless and turbulent spirits....

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...spirit of
Friedrich August Wolf to be found, of whom Franz Passow could say
that he seemed...

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...has its source there. An
American may tell them what a centre of mighty forces a...