Thoughts out of Season, Part I David Strauss, the Confessor and the Writer - Richard Wagner in Bayreuth.

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 0

...(Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)





THOUGHTS OUT OF SEASON

PART ONE

DAVID STRAUSS, THE CONFESSOR

AND...

Page 1

...ordinary publisher and his
staff of translators: he has not, therefore, entered into any
engagement with publishers,...

Page 2

...tough and stubborn race. The arrow that is to
fly far must be discharged from a...

Page 3

...drink tea with them, discuss with them, and
ask them to contribute to their newspapers!

To get...

Page 4

...aren't you accustomed to
criticism on the part of German philosophers? Is it not the ancient
and...

Page 5

...Sancho Panza may escape a good many sad experiences
by knowing his master's weaknesses. But as...

Page 6

...institutions, the sovereign
rights of the people, are ideas of British origin, and have been
propagated from...

Page 7

...in the British mind. I cannot help pointing out the grave
consequences of this backwardness of...

Page 8

...and Nietzsche you perceive starting from the same
pessimistic diagnosis of the wild anarchy, the growing...

Page 9

...fool." But if these two great men
cannot refrain from such outspoken vituperation--they also lead the
way:...

Page 10

...all his life, he was
really fighting Christianity, the Protestant Form of which is at the
root...

Page 11

...but have distributed it all over the earth, from Nazareth
to Nishni-Novgorod, from Jerusalem to Jamaica,...

Page 12

...long beard
of his. For the old Jew has recognised some one coming from afar--some
one whom...

Page 13

...and as to the one direction in which he always travelled,
despite apparent deviations and windings....

Page 14

...of the first _Thought out of Season_, expresses his utter
astonishment that a total stranger should...

Page 15

...revealed in this paper. Let us, however, examine the internal
evidence we speak of, and let...

Page 16

...the same when he left as when he met him, what the real
nature of the...

Page 17

...text
contains the name 'Wagner'" (p. 68).

As we have already hinted, there are evidences of his...

Page 18

...for him who has never been unhealthy enough for
this 'infernal voluptuousness'; it is allowable and...

Page 19

...an error,--for there are illusions which are both
salutary and blessed,--but because it threatens to convert...

Page 20

...more and more doubtful; for I realise how fully convinced
every one is that such a...

Page 21

...other triumphant culture of the new German classics,
save in respect of the quantum of knowledge....

Page 22

...newness, as of a country fair, which
his scholars then proceed to contemplate and to define...

Page 23

...with the public mind
have blindfolded their eyes and closed their ears. The incongruity is
not even...

Page 24

...into
the belief that here a culture must be established and flourishing. But
Philistinism, despite its systematic...

Page 25

...that a whole procession of grand and heroic figures
has already filed past us, whose every...

Page 26

...the heyday and
confusion of seeking, experimenting, destroying, promising, surmising,
and hoping was sweeping in currents and...

Page 27

...of
the real claims of culture. They therefore concentrated and utilised
all their forces in those quarters...

Page 28

...him, and increase the well-being of
"reality"; while the former, far from doing him any harm,...

Page 29

...was the Werther of Greece, a hopeless lover; his
life was full of softness and yearning,...

Page 30

...oneself away; for
what could not the purple mantle of triumph conceal? The strength of
the Culture-Philistine...

Page 31

...of those
principles. These clumsy creatures may, perhaps, have found what they
sought in the last book;...

Page 32

...rejoiced with all his heart over his rough
places and his wrongheaded and candid singularities, and...

Page 33

...built, and no profession of
faith been made. And I do indeed call this a result!...

Page 34

...is truly
not a very comforting one. In the book of confessions, however, there
is a page...

Page 35

...describes even the most
suspicious of our doings! Here indeed is our man; for his heaven...

Page 36

...his joy at all the beauties
to be seen, he should by any chance be tempted...

Page 37

...from Kant as from a cold-water cure. All this is
certainly new and striking; but, even...

Page 38

...unity in him
of the writer and the man, of the head and the heart." The...

Page 39

...the
malicious egoists: in spite of you each of them created his works,
against you each directed...

Page 40

...music for the home.

But whoever can this Sweetmeat-Beethoven of Strauss's be? He is said
to have...

Page 41

...and not necessarily one concerning Beethoven alone,
but concerning "the classical prose-writer" himself. He, the
celebrated author,...

Page 42

...had perceived something godless and immoral in them, but
people actually rejoice over his candid confessions...

Page 43

...was unable to discover better similes
in its praise. But what is the oil called which...

Page 44

...address these words? To
him who has clearly never even studied Schopenhauer, the latter might
well have...

Page 45

...upon Hegel and Schleiermacher, and that his
teaching of the Cosmos, his way of regarding things...

Page 46

...the
indescribable sufferings of humanity. When a philosopher like Strauss
is able to frame it into a...

Page 47

...yet this has
always been the bent of my moral and intellectual nature." A moral and
intellectual...

Page 48

...with a genuine and seriously
constructed ethical system, based upon Darwin's teaching.

Says Strauss: "I should say...

Page 49

...been quite alike, and that the
ascent of man from the lowest species of animals to...

Page 50

...own.
Without any further warrant, he assumes that all that has happened
possesses the highest intellectual value;...

Page 51

...theatre of reason, but of error,
and that no conformity to law can contain anything consoling,...

Page 52

...with everywhere, and you are
perfectly justified in promising to those who happen to be kicked...

Page 53

...to have greeted it as a canon for strong intellects, and,
from all accounts, the professors...

Page 54

...said and done, can only be of interest
to that person who believes in eternal life...

Page 55

...the very midst of all this
agitated and breathless running to and fro--this sprawling
scientifically?

For _it_ no...

Page 56

...the most unwieldy. Genuine culture therefore leaves such
places as these religiously alone, for its best...

Page 57

...gaze of the struggling man of
culture--if they ever possessed it--that gaze which condemns even the
scurry...

Page 58

...all
the demands of an ideal example of its kind. The theological
opponents, despite the fact that...

Page 59

...the task of building his house, and
whether he really understands the architecture of a book....

Page 60

...illogical
simply because the third question has nothing to do with the second,
nor the fourth with...

Page 61

...God. On the pages in
question, however, he cannot claim to be altogether scientific; but if
only...

Page 62

...though the famous "We" were
not only in duty bound to believe in the "All," but...

Page 63

...and educated men as his most probable audience, experience
ought certainly to have told him that...

Page 64

...him "incomparable
skill"? The confession to the effect that the treatise was
intentionally "lightly equipped" leads us...

Page 65

...his coach, but with
the polite reservation that he could not assert that it would fulfil
every...

Page 66

...so much with the stylist as with the
man." According to this, Strauss seems only too...

Page 67

...being, in the opinion of many, a classical writer of prose. "He has
therefore achieved his...

Page 68

...do that too!'" That was the voice of the real Straussian
genius, which also asked him...

Page 69

...affairs continues," he says,
"in the year 1900 German classics will cease to be understood, for...

Page 70

...literally lost all taste, and their
palate is rather gratified than not by the most corrupt...

Page 71

...Germany seems to have
given a thought to these extraordinary notions under the yoke of which
almost...

Page 72

...Whereon, a plurality of gods instead of the one, is
explained in this deduction of religion,...

Page 73

...hearts of modern
Germans, such faith in this great and seductive stylist Strauss: I
refer to his...

Page 74

...to be written in a new
language. "For in these books," says Schopenhauer, "I find a...

Page 75

...way, as a stylist, he has lost his most valuable possessions,
and stands condemned to remain...

Page 76

...I come to the end of my confession of faith. This is the
confession of an...

Page 77

...his master; for there is a very intimate relation between
greatness and the instinct which discerns...

Page 78

...day, can only be accessible to all that
Wagner does and thinks by means of parody,--and...

Page 79

...cleansed"? Be
silent and cleansed! Only the merit of being included among those who
give ear to...

Page 80

...forward there is an end
to all groping, straying, and sprouting of offshoots, and over his
most...

Page 81

...born with a more than usual capacity for imitating, succumbs to
the morbid multiformity of modern...

Page 82

...hovered over
him as a consoling angel, it covered him with its wings, and showed
him the...

Page 83

...rarest and most beautiful examples of
fidelity: that of brother to sister, of friend to friend,...

Page 84

...better
than choke-damp. In this temptation, and in the act of resisting it,
lie the dangers that...

Page 85

...the
state of want was momentarily relieved. Life grew ever more and more
complicated for him; but...

Page 86

...of languages, the mythologist
and the myth poet, who was the first to include all these...

Page 87

...acquaint men, even in the remotest ages
to come, with the nature of Germany's soul? Will...

Page 88

...notion of; but it requires to be written in a much
more earnest and severe spirit,...

Page 89

...works as complete as his
were_, which bade him suffer and learn, that he might accomplish...

Page 90

...than
adequately Orientalised, begins to yearn once more for Hellenism. He
who wishes to help her in...

Page 91

...namely in art, they
must, in accordance with the law of their inner being, spread their
influence...

Page 92

...creator of works which
are in themselves an overflowing treasury of artistic triumphs. Does
it not seem...

Page 93

...modern culture would receive its deadliest blow if the tacit
support which these natures give it...

Page 94

...consecration! The
greatest of all torments harassing him, the conflicting beliefs and
opinions among men, the unreliability...

Page 95

...in the whole of his span of years, something sacred
may cross his path which will...

Page 96

...and
struggling life is regarded as striving mightily after conscious
freedom and independence of thought, only then...

Page 97

...a point is reached when the morbid
accumulation of its means and forms attains to such...

Page 98

...that it is disguised and masked--sordid
impotence, devouring dissension, assiduous ennui, dishonest distress!
The appearance of present-day...

Page 99

...in mind that the soul of music now wishes to acquire a
body, that, by means...

Page 100

...to be deceived for one moment
into nursing solid hopes by this something which exhausts all...

Page 101

...in this artificially induced excitement. It is as if people
were afraid of sinking beneath the...

Page 102

...Formerly financiers were looked
down upon with honest scorn, even though they were recognised as
needful; for...

Page 103

...sole task the
defending--and excusing of the present

Against what accusers? one asks, surprised.

Against its own bad...

Page 104

...night. Nature is much richer, more
powerful, more blessed and more terrible below the surface; ye...

Page 105

...them with the
richest treasures it possesses,--and, according to the oldest and most
recent experience, its favoured...

Page 106

...falls
to the lot of a soul engaged upon a journey, _i.e._ feeling sympathy
with others and...

Page 107

...by which he compelled
them to understand him, by which he compelled the masses to understand
him....

Page 108

...like Faust, would either be obliged
to turn blind, or be permitted to become so. For...

Page 109

...in the midst of Society and State--and as what does he stand
there? Maybe he is...

Page 110

...the dithyrambic quality of his movements speaks just as
eloquently of quivering comprehension and of powerful...

Page 111

...every stage in his career he understood just as
much of his predecessors as he himself...

Page 112

...whole prevaricating spirit of
modern art. And while becoming the critic of "effect," indications of
his own...

Page 113

...is a luxury; he saw this, and understood that it must stand
or fall with the...

Page 114

...his soul; they constituted his most urgent need:--in this
way he was able to ascertain how...

Page 115

...question by writing about it;
but this only led to fresh confusion and more uproar,--for a...

Page 116

...was nothing to induce him to continue this
indulgence: all he desired now was to come...

Page 117

...in awe
from it. As he thus silently furthered his greatest work and gradually
laid score upon...

Page 118

...might set that example which nobody else could
set, and thus establish a _tradition of style_,...

Page 119

...way of performing his works,
and his attempts at training individual singers in the new style,...

Page 120

...years; and which to Wagner himself is but a cloud of distress,
care, meditation, and grief,...

Page 121

...world, but
through the medium of a chain of events, actions, and pains. The Ring
of the...

Page 122

...loved his
language and exacted a great deal from it, Wagner suffered more than
any other German...

Page 123

...place, however, no one who studies Wagner the poet and
word-painter should forget that none of...

Page 124

...rhythm could once more dare to manifest itself in
the general proportions of the edifice; for...

Page 125

...this earlier kind of music, the joy we always experience while
listening to Wagner's compositions is...

Page 126

...depth of feeling and any excess thereof were regarded as
"unethical." Once, however, the art of...

Page 127

...must be
imparted, and that this must be done as distinctly as possible,
becomes ever more and...

Page 128

...seems to be torn asunder as if it were
travelling towards different points, gradually we perceive...

Page 129

...or compels one to forget it by the
peremptory way he calls attention to the subject...

Page 130

...reached this now, but in a
much higher sense, seeing that every performance to be witnessed...

Page 131

...more desirous of imposing upon all men of
talent the new duty of joining him in...

Page 132

...unless they be such as can
help him towards making his work eternal. He cannot be...

Page 133

...still be unable to
dispense with the thing contemned,--this really constitutes the
wretchedness of the artist of...

Page 134

..."Concerning the Art
of Conducting," "Concerning Actors and Singers," "State and Religion,"
silence all contradiction, and, like...

Page 135

...that distinguishes his art from every other
art of modern times, it is that it no...

Page 136

...to seek those established powers that
have the goodwill to protect the noblest passions of man...

Page 137

...rather--

Soar aloft in daring flight
Out of sight...

Page 138

...from its presence; they are the language of nature--_reinstated_
even in mankind; they stand for what...

Page 139

...the fact that he no
longer has the means to take possession of the golden Ring--that
symbol...

Page 140

...heavenly dome of beauty and goodness and to say, This is our
life, that Wagner has...