Thoughts out of Season, Part I

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...This eBook was produced by Holden McGroin.


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... ...

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... _______

THE Editor begs...

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...for the rest of Europe.

It is the consciousness of the importance of this work which...

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...of gross stupidity, an opposition
regardless of the wounds it inflicts and of the precious lives...

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...that European thought which
began with Goethe and has found so fine a development in Nietzsche.
True,...

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...language towards you? Has there not always
been among the few thinking heads in Germany a...

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...pleasure of
being thrashed in the company of your Master: no, you will be thrashed
all alone,...

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...have been embraced with much more fervour by other nations
than by that in which they...

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...like a stream,
which all the peoples of Europe will have to cross: they will come...

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...about progress and evolution, behind that veil of
business-bustle, which hides its fear and utter despair--but...

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...they both deprecate the influence of society and
socialisation; they both intensely praise and love life,...

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...of nations has been occasioned by "the powerful assault on the
Divinity of the Semitic Literature...

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...in every Anarchist, and therefore in
every Christian, there is also, or may be, an aristocrat--a...

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...secretly always
mourned, as only the race of the psalmists and the prophets can
mourn--and he rushes...

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...Nietzsche had one very
definite and unaltered purpose, ideal and direction, and this was "the
elevation of...

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...himself did, that is to say,
simply as a glass, focusing the whole light of our...

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...all his circle,
the whole city and country in which he lived--yea, even the whole
continent on...

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...Dionysian
Grecian art. Enemies of Nietzsche began to whisper that he was merely
Wagner's "literary lackey"; many...

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...us to prove this, and not merely when
we read these works between the lines, but...

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...my own use and be the stronger
for it--I declare Wagner to be the great benefactor...

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...to such account that it
may not ultimately proxe a seiious rout.

But of all evil results...

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...spontaneous fury of the
Frenchman, against the inward enemy, against the highly suspicious
and, at all events,...

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...that their own
scholarship is the ripest and most perfect fruit of the age--in fact,
of all...

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...his town; every visit he pays to his art-dealers and to his
trader in the articles...

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...with that earnest vehemence and honesty which is
peculiar to greatness admit, and have admitted, this...

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...the profusion of forms has not taken place), it
is just possible that the confusion underlying...

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...and the weary, the fetters
of those who would run towards lofty goals, the poisonous mist...

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...by reading their works, means to yield to
those feeble and selfish emotions which all the...

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...to reject all the efforts of disturbing innovators summarily as
the work of epigones. With the...

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...is always grateful to any
artist who heeds him and listens to caution. He then assures...

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...words, wrecked by
Philistinism. This man was Holderlin, and the afore-mentioned aesthete
was therefore justified, under the...

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...of a much more beautiful
name: it was the famous "healthiness" of the Culture-Philistine. In
view of...

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...kind of
faith which happens to be compatible with natures of the Straussian
order, and what it...

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...thinker in David
Strauss; now they have discovered the "believer" in him, and are
disappointed. Had he...

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...about for a compliment, you gallant old
religious founder! But let us be straightforward with you....

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...our lives, but,
as such, to exercise a very lasting historical influence into the
bargain, and to...

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...the writings of our great poets, in the
performances of our great musicians, we find a...

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...rude reality, and the cramping confines of actual life, we
are again on all sides assailed...

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...beads. Their arms and eyes moved, and a screw
inside them creaked an accompaniment to their...

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...to know how a Hallelujah
sung by Strauss would sound: I believe one would have to...

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...without
once daring to attempt that eternal flight for which he had been born.
And what are...

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...admission of the Doorkeeper of the New Faith to the
sanctum of music. The Master threw...

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...a little too modest. Who, indeed, will enlighten us concerning
this Sweetmeat-Beethoven, if not Strauss himself--the...

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...cense his idols with
their smoke. Suppose, for a moment, that by some accident, the Eroica,
the...

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...for rodents. In this, we have the answer to our first
question: How does the believer...

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...or withered without causing
any pain. As a matter of fact, he does not really prick...

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...the mature man, full of
the daring of the discoverer and conqueror in the realm of...

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...is a bad thought, then it follows
naturally that the world is good. As a rule,...

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...Christian era, than by supposing the existence of
a previous period of surfeit in the matter...

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...alone are used, and
these he selects from among the most insulting he can find. He
moreover...

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...the same
time be either a Patagonian or Strauss himself, what should we then
not have to...

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...one primal source of
all life, all reason, and all good: this is the essence of...

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...His left only the ever-living desire for it, although on
condition of perpetual error, left him...

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...for the same reason, too, that he
assumes for once the utterly unsuitable rôle of a...

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...this meagre wisdom in the guise of
omniscience,--these are the features in this book which I...

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...faithfully
reflected. For therein lay the feat. The Master feigned to have
presented us with a new...

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...ahead at such a frantic
speed in Germany, that one would almost think the scientific world
were...

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...of rest
and that incidental semi-listless attention to, and coming to terms
with, philosophy, culture, and every...

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...been
acknowledged classical, and tihence to our last and principal theme.

To begin with, that culture has...

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...crowd have learned to
ask six consecutive times for the Master's Philistine
sleeping-mixture?

If, without further ado, we...

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...bitterness which
Strauss's profession of faith may have provoked here and there, even
the most fanatical of...

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...prose-writer. This last-mentioned
talent alone, it is true, would not suffice to class him with the
classical...

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...republicanism, and capital punishment--Strauss
himself seems to have been aware that they could only have been
muddled...

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...that he still possesses a belief and a religion; he reaches it
by means of stings...

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...case that the subject of
belief himself be tormented and stabbed with the view of bringing...

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...his own book. Nor
do his public eulogisers refrain from using the same expression in
reference to...

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...as if that
mysterious feeling for the All were only calculated to produce an
aesthetic effect, to...

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...could now persist in doubting the existence of this incomparable
skill? The complete master of his...

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...in style; it is ever the sign of genius,
which alone has the privilege to express...

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...about the
streets in the garb of lightly equipped goddesses as a classic, while
Strauss the Philistine,...

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...newest, innocent,
and lightly equipped modern Philistine's testament was. Others can do
that too! And many could...

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...will bring about, Schopenhauer, perhaps, has spoken
most forcibly. "If the existing state of affairs continues,"...

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...their trade, most thoroughly inured to the effluvia of this
journalistic jargon; they have literally lost...

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...decently educated Frenchman would have the
right to laugh. But no conscientious native of Germany seems...

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...the earlier stages of religion, there appear many instead of
this single Whereon, a plurality of...

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...I may
succeed in showing what it is that inspires, in the hearts of modern
Germans, such...

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...dive into those other works,
those ancient works which seem to him still to be written...

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...a boy brought up amid the beating of drums, grew dull, and
became incapable of detecting...

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...host of idols; that it has completely lost the healthy and
manly instinct for what is...

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...record little or nothing of such abortive
efforts. Hence the anxiety which every one must feel...

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...most remarkable
movements in the present world of culture, he would find much to
interest him there....

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...a new
interpretation. The last hour has come for a good many things; this
new art is...

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... ...

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...an artist. He ran the constant risk
of becoming infected by that dangerously dissipated attitude of...

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...failure,
ultimately turn to evil. The inadequacy of means for obtaining success
may, in certain circumstances, be...

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...in love-beams does Nature here display herself,
that clouds and tempests--yea, and even the sublime itself--seem...

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...therefrom is
an overflowing source of suffering for those in process of
development. Each of his instincts...

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...nature of the circles into which he gravitated, we can
hardly realise how he was able...

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...or a rule, borne
hither and thither by disturbing illusions. From a novice trying his
strength, Wagner...

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...to
come face to face with a hero who, in regard to modern culture, "has
never learned...

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...to say, a creature inwardly coming to peace with
himself, serenely secluded in himself and taking...

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...its noblest exponents
press its soporific and comforting powers so strongly to the fore,
that all lovers...

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...that they
would hang in the air as unsolved problems, if it were not possible,
by spanning...

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...if I may be allowed to use a medical expression, he has an
astringent power. And...

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...and deleterious atmosphere of our modern art conditions:
when, however, people like our men of culture...

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...they who are
suffering under the yoke of modern institutions?" he will inquire.
"Where are my natural...

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...be done to us than to suppose that we are
concerned with art alone, as though...

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...or adviser; the things
after which a tragic hero strives are not necessarily worth striving
after. As...

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...world; for there is
no more blessed joy than that which consists in knowing what we
know--how...

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...evil which is as widespread as
civilisation itself among men; language is everywhere diseased, and
the burden...

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...thinking and reasoning being out
of man, before one has succeeded in making him a creature...

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...is not openly exacted by civilised
people, there is no greater evidence of this requisite relation...

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...to elevate us out of barbarity: in reality,
it lacks the stirring and creative soul of...

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...and despise, if he is capable of
loving, sympathising, and assisting in the general work of
construction,...

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...him from higher spheres,
but whose sound he can hear only very indistinctly. The artist who
happens...

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...the newspaper and the telegraph. Improve each shining hour,
turn it to some account and judge...

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...The souls of those few who
really feel the utter ignominy of this mission and its...

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...moreover, that
real music is of a piece with fate and primitive law; for it is...

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...But a most blessed foreboding
leads one to ask whether it is possible for the grandest...

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...in Wagner
the whole visible world desires to be spiritualised, absorbed, and
lost in the world of...

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...at once, as the mediator and intercessor
between apparently separated spheres, the one who reinstalls the...

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...it was
in the presence of the realistic that our eyes began to see, and we
require...

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...to bring
his clear, sleepless, and conscious life into touch with somnambulists
and ghostly well-intentioned creatures. Thus...

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...the image of
Nature and her wooer, hovers forward; it condenses into more human
shapes; it spreads...

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...and he
never doubted that he would be able to do what they had done. In...

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...through him. It seems as if from
that time forward the spirit of music spoke to...

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...which it forms but a part. This
society had but one idea, to use its power...

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...sorrow was to that of the
people, when they came into being, and how they must...

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...musician
who writes and thinks was, at that time, a thing unknown. The cry
arose: "He is...

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...come to terms with himself, to
think of the nature of the world in dramatic actions,...

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...upon score, something happened which caused him to stop and
listen: friends were coming, a kind...

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...style, not on paper, not by
means of signs, but through impressions made upon the very...

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...the new style, were
foiled time after time, owing only to the thoughtlessness and iron
tradition that...

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...meditation, and grief, a fresh passionate outbreak of
antagonistic elements, but all bathed in the starlight...

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...children of an artificial ulture would have us believe;
but it is in itself a thought:...

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...from it; and yet, when he smote the rock, he brought
forth an abundant flow. Precisely...

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...and,
by that time, it seems to me things will go better with the German
language than...

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...light and warmth to the action. The whole
of the dramatist's stock in trade could be...

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...of serious treatment, or a thing with which to
train and instruct those who were not...

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...and primitive stages in the development of music. The fear of
passion suggested the first rule,...

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...clear to the
listener, because it was never really clear, even in the mind of the
composer....

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...host of cross currents dominated by one great violent
stream; and though at first this stream...

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...grasp of a thing; in him, too, we
have the hand's quick clutch and the grip...

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...his friends would have
liked to preach to him, and his enemies would fain have done...

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...the
imitation of what is best. Wagnerian ends and means are of one piece:
to perceive this,...

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...dispassionate observer merely to shrug his
shoulders; and he erred again and again, only so as...

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...not wish to save her own soul, but that of the child lying in
her lap:...

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...of Wagner; all that can
possibly be learnt concerning the origin of a work of art...

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...in him, which is
ready to make any sacrifice, rather tends to reinstall him among the
scholars...

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...ages until that remote future
is reached? How can we so dam the flood of a...

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...which he will see the type of all those who suffer a common
distress, and who...

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...traditional morality;
that the free man is just as able to be good as evil, but...

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...short moment of thrilling happiness,
just as though they had actually escaped from the present, from
illusions...

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...sovereign spear was broken in the contest with the
freest man, and who lost his power...