The Twilight of the Idols - The Antichrist Complete Works, Volume Sixteen

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 72

that wine provokes
desire, that man in certain circumstances lives on fruit, that plants
bloom in the spring and fade in the autumn. As regards the astounding
wealth of rites, symbols and myths which take their origin in the orgy,
and with which the world of antiquity is literally smothered, Lobeck
finds that it prompts him to a feat of even greater ingenuity than
the foregoing phenomenon did. "The Greeks," he says, (_Aglaophamus,_
I. p. 672), "when they had nothing better to do, laughed, sprang and
romped about, or, inasmuch as men also like a change at times, they
would sit down, weep and bewail their lot Others then came up who tried
to discover some reason for this strange behaviour; and thus, as an
explanation of these habits, there arose an incalculable number of
festivals, legends, and myths. On the other hand it was believed that
the _farcical performances_ which then perchance began to take place
on festival days, necessarily formed part of the celebrations, and
they were retained as an indispensable part of the ritual."--This is
contemptible nonsense, and no one will take a man like Lobeck seriously
for a moment We are very differently affected when we examine the
notion "Hellenic," as Winckelmann and Goethe conceived it, and find it
incompatible with that element out of which Dionysian art springs--I
speak of orgiasm. In reality I do not doubt that Goethe would have
completely excluded any such thing from the potentialities of the Greek
soul. _Consequently Goethe did not understand the Greeks._ For it is
only in the Dionysian mysteries, in the psychology of the Dionysian
state, that the _fundamental fact_ of the Hellenic instinct--its "will
to life"--is expressed. What did the Hellene secure himself with these
mysteries? _Eternal_ life, the eternal recurrence of life; the future
promised and hallowed in the past; the triumphant Yea to life despite
death and change; real life conceived as the collective prolongation
of life through procreation, through the mysteries of sexuality.
To the Greeks, the symbol of sex was the most venerated of symbols,
the really deep significance of all the piety of antiquity. All the
details of the act of procreation, pregnancy and birth gave rise to
the loftiest and most solemn feelings. In the doctrine of mysteries,
_pain_ was pronounced holy: the "pains of childbirth" sanctify pain in
general,--all becoming and all growth, everything that guarantees the
future _involves_ pain.... In order that there may be eternal joy in
creating, in order that the will to life may say Yea to itself in all
eternity, the "pains of childbirth" must also be eternal. All this is
what

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Text Comparison with Götzen-Dämmerung

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Oder ein Zeichen davon, dass die Luft feucht ist, dass Südwinde herankommen.
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Irrthum der Verwechslung von Ursache und Folge.
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- Vom Traume auszugehn: einer bestimmten Empfindung, zum Beispiel in Folge eines fernen Kanonenschusses, wird nachträglich eine Ursache untergeschoben (oft ein ganzer kleiner Roman, in dem gerade der Träumende die Hauptperson ist).
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Nicht zu vergessen, dass militärische Privilegien den Zu-Viel-Besuch der höheren Schulen, das heisst ihren Untergang, förmlich erzwingen.
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1.
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Anti-Darwin.
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16.
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Meine Furcht ist gross, dass der moderne Mensch für einige Laster einfach zu bequem ist: so dass diese geradezu aussterben.
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Wenn ein Philosoph Nihilist sein könnte, so würde er es sein, weil er das Nichts hinter allen Idealen des Menschen findet.
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Plato wirft, wie mir scheint, alle Formen des Stils durcheinander, er ist damit ein erster décadent des Stils: er hat etwas Ähnliches auf dem Gewissen, wie die Cyniker, die die satura Menippea erfanden.
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Man muss ihn Zeile für Zeile umwenden und seine Hintergedanken so deutlich ablesen wie seine Worte: es giebt wenige so hintergedankenreiche Denker.
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Also sprach Zarathustra - 3, 90.