The Twilight of the Idols - The Antichrist Complete Works, Volume Sixteen

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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THE TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS

BY

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

Or, How to Philosophise with the Hammer


THE ANTICHRIST

_NOTES TO ZARATHUSTRA, AND ETERNAL RECURRENCE_


TRANSLATED BY

ANTHONY M. LUDOVICI


The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche

The First Complete and Authorised English Translation

Edited by Dr Oscar Levy

Volume Sixteen

T.N. FOULIS

13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET

EDINBURGH: AND LONDON

1911



CONTENTS

TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE
PREFACE
MAXIMS AND MISSILES
THE PROBLEM OF SOCRATES
"REASON" IN PHILOSOPHY
HOW THE "TRUE WORLD" ULTIMATELY BECAME A FABLE
MORALITY AS THE ENEMY OF NATURE
THE FOUR GREAT ERRORS
THE "IMPROVERS" OF MANKIND
THINGS THE GERMANS LACK
SKIRMISHES IN A WAR WITH THE ACT
THINGS I OWE TO THE ANCIENTS

THE ANTICHRIST

ETERNAL RECURRENCE

NOTES TO ZARATHUSTRA




TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE


_The Twilight of the Idols_ was written towards the end of the summer
of 1888, its composition seems to have occupied only a few days,--so
few indeed that, in _Ecce Homo_ (p. 118), Nietzsche says he hesitates
to give their number; but, in any case, we know it was completed on the
3rd of September in Sils Maria. The manuscript which was dispatched to
the printers on the 7th of September bore the title: "_Idle Hours of a
Psychologist_"; this, however, was abandoned in favour of the present
title, while the work was going through the press. During September
and the early part of October 1888, Nietzsche added to the original
contents of the book by inserting the whole section entitled "Things
the Germans Lack," and aphorisms 32-43 of "Skirmishes in a War with the
Age"; and the book, as it now stands, represents exactly the form in
which Nietzsche intended to publish it in the course of the year 1889.
Unfortunately its author was already stricken down with illness when
the work first appeared at the end of January 1889, and he was denied
the joy of seeing it run into nine editions, of one thousand each,
before his death in 1900.

Of _The Twilight of the Idols,_ Nietzsche says in _Ecce Homo_ (p.
118):--"If anyone should desire to obtain a rapid sketch of how
everything before my time was standing on its head, he should begin
reading me in this book. That which is called 'Idols' on the title-page
is simply the old

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Text Comparison with The Genealogy of Morals The Complete Works, Volume Thirteen, edited by Dr. Oscar Levy.

Page 1
This took place in the winter of 1876-77; the thoughts themselves are older.
Page 3
Similarly, Aph.
Page 4
The issue was, strangely enough, the value of the "un-egoistic" instincts, the instincts of pity, self-denial, and self-sacrifice which Schopenhauer had so persistently painted in golden colours, deified and etherealised, that eventually they appeared to him, as it were, high and dry, as "intrinsic values in themselves," on the strength of which he uttered both to Life and to himself his own negation.
Page 9
The standpoint of utility is as alien and as inapplicable as it could possibly be, when we have to deal with so volcanic an effervescence of supreme values, creating and demarcating as they do a hierarchy within themselves: it is at this juncture that one arrives at an appreciation of the contrast to that tepid temperature, which is the presupposition on which every combination of worldly wisdom and every calculation of practical expediency is always based--and not for one occasional, not for one exceptional instance, but chronically.
Page 27
_, c.
Page 28
_" _Per fidem_: so stands it written.
Page 32
That task of breeding an animal which can make promises, includes, as we have already grasped, as its condition and preliminary, the more immediate task of first _making_ man to a certain extent, necessitated, uniform, like among his like, regular, and consequently calculable.
Page 34
" When man thinks it necessary to make for himself a memory, he never accomplishes it without blood, tortures, and sacrifice; the most dreadful sacrifices and forfeitures (among them the sacrifice of the first-born), the most loathsome mutilation (for instance, castration), the most cruel rituals of all the religious cults (for all religions are really at bottom systems of cruelty)--all.
Page 45
Dühring, _Value of Life; Course of Philosophy_, and _passim_.
Page 46
In what sphere up to the present has the whole administration of law, the actual need of law, found its earthly home? Perchance in the sphere of the reacting man? Not for a minute: rather in that of the active, strong, spontaneous, aggressive man? I deliberately defy the above-mentioned agitator (who himself makes this self-confession, "the creed of revenge has run through all my works and endeavours like the red thread of Justice"), and say, that judged historically law in the world represents the very war _against_ the reactive feelings, the very war waged on those feelings by the powers of activity and aggression, which devote some of their strength to damming and keeping within bounds this effervescence of hysterical reactivity, and to forcing it to some compromise.
Page 61
" The fact that _in itself_ the conception of gods is not bound to lead necessarily to this degradation of the imagination (a temporary representation of whose vagaries we.
Page 68
Who would consider it even thinkable, that he would have had the _courage_ for an ascetic ideal, without the support afforded him by the philosophy of Schopenhauer, without the.
Page 85
.
Page 87
" Right into the hallowed chambers of knowledge can it make itself heard, can this hoarse yelping of sick hounds, this rabid lying and frenzy of such "noble" Pharisees (I remind readers, who have ears, once more of that Berlin apostle of revenge, Eugen Dühring, who makes the most disreputable and revolting use in all present-day Germany of moral refuse; Dühring, the paramount moral blusterer that there is to-day, even among his own kidney, the Anti-Semites).
Page 95
We wish, therefore, to pay honour to the idea of "redemption" in the great religions, but it is somewhat hard to remain serious in view of the appreciation meted out to the _deep sleep_ by these exhausted pessimists who are too tired even to dream--to the deep sleep considered, that is, as already a fusing into Brahman, as the attainment of the _unio mystica_ with God.
Page 99
Dr.
Page 101
Imagine man, suffering from himself, some way or other but at any rate physiologically, perhaps like an animal shut up in a cage, not clear as to the why and the wherefore! imagine him in his desire for reasons--reasons bring relief--in his desire again for remedies, narcotics at last, consulting one, who knows even the occult--and see, lo and behold, he gets a hint from his wizard, the ascetic priest, his _first_ hint on the "cause" of his trouble: he must search for it in _himself_, in his guiltiness, in a piece of the past, he must understand his very suffering as a _state of punishment_.
Page 109
Has indeed any European, any Christian freethinker, ever yet wandered into this proposition and its labyrinthine consequences? Does he know _from experience_ the Minotauros of this den.
Page 116
".
Page 124
This is our distrust, which recurs again and again; our care, which never lets us sleep; our question, which no one listens to or wishes to listen to; our Sphinx, near which there is more than one precipice: we believe that the men of present-day Europe are deceived in regard to the things which we love best, and a pitiless demon (no, not pitiless, only indifferent and puerile)--plays with our hearts and their enthusiasm, as it may perhaps have already played with everything that lived and loved; I believe that everything which we Europeans of to-day are in the habit of admiring as the values of all these respected things called "humanity," "mankind," "sympathy," "pity," may be of some value as the debilitation and moderating of certain powerful and dangerous primitive impulses.