The Joyful Wisdom Complete Works, Volume Ten

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...(Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)





THE JOYFUL WISDOM

("LA GAYA SCIENZA")

BY

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE


TRANSLATED BY

THOMAS COMMON

WITH...

Page 1

...it might still be doubtful whether any one could be brought
nearer to the _experiences_ in...

Page 2

...extraordinarily bad and wicked announces itself: _incipit
parodia,_ there is no doubt....



2.


--But let us leave Herr...

Page 3

...higher than war,
every ethic with a negative grasp of the idea of happiness, every
metaphysic and...

Page 4

...we are still less at liberty to separate
soul and spirit. We are not thinking frogs,...

Page 5

...such severe sickness, and out of
the sickness of strong suspicion--_new-born,_ with the skin cast;
more sensitive,...

Page 6

...herself behind enigmas and motley uncertainties. Perhaps
truth is a woman who has reasons for not...

Page 7

...He that can forget, is cured.


5.

_To the...

Page 8

...and clean,
The fools' and the sages' go-between:
All...

Page 9

...entangled more securely,
I can't expound myself aright:
...

Page 10

... Never fear! Just wait, I swear it
...

Page 11

... _Seneca et hoc Genus omne._

They write and write...

Page 12

...he sees but star on star!


41.

_Heraclitism._

...

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...For me the starry course is o'er,
No sun and shadow as...

Page 14

...what his _fancy_ pins:
What does his fancy pin? What he _can_...

Page 15

...you more?
"That's what I'm seeking--reasons why I'm here!"


...

Page 16

...longer know, my dear fellow-man
and neighbour, if thou _canst_ at all live to the disadvantage...

Page 17

...impulse, which rules equally in the noblest
and the ignoblest, the impulse to the conservation of...

Page 18

...has to
fulfil one more condition of existence than the other animals: man
_must_ from time to...

Page 19

...regard as _contemptible,_ and it is this
sentiment which I first of all search for in...

Page 20

...friend,
is brain also.") It is the unreason, or perverse reason of passion,
which the ignoble man...

Page 21

...is the good! The good men of every age are those who go to the
roots...

Page 22

...duty: propriety demands this
from them, and not only propriety.


6.

_Loss of Dignity.--_Meditation has lost all its...

Page 23

...attain, according
to the different moral climates, would furnish too much work for the
most laborious; whole...

Page 24

...as possible--that
suffices us!"--Oh, ye unexacting creatures!


9.

_Our Eruptions._--Numberless things which humanity acquired in its
earlier stages, but...

Page 25

...a man to break down earlier than might be necessary. If the
conserving bond of the...

Page 26

...growth of a fullness of refined delights and
enjoyments rarely tasted hitherto! If ye decide for...

Page 27

...the prospect
of revenge, scorn, punishment and failure. Perhaps only tee most
susceptible to the sense of...

Page 28

...is just possessing. To become
satiated with a possession, that is to become satiated with ourselves.
(One...

Page 29

...experienced it? Its right name is _friendship._


15.

_Out of the Distance._--This mountain makes the whole district...

Page 30

...into the arms of a fountain-nymph, and
thus motivates the poverty:--and who would not like him...

Page 31

...called
_good,_ not in respect to the results they have for himself, but in
respect to the...

Page 32

...for the
teaching and embodying of virtuous habits a series of effects of virtue
are displayed, which...

Page 33

...maxim,
"Thou shalt renounce thyself and offer thyself as a sacrifice," in
order not to be inconsistent...

Page 34

...morning
dream, probably owing to the violent strokes of the tower-clock, which
just then announced the fifth...

Page 35

...and the flame of knowledge flashes heavenward in full
blaze.--Thirdly, as if in amends for the...

Page 36

...The individuals, as is well known, the men who
only live for themselves, provide for the...

Page 37

...country
in which dissatisfaction on a grand scale and the capacity for
transformation have died out for...

Page 38

...this effect, however, which
he makes upon us he is well content: he wants to keep...

Page 39

...in the sun, because it is advantageous for their
own ends to be regarded temporarily as...

Page 40

...I do with these two youths! called
out a philosopher dejectedly, who "corrupted" youths, as Socrates...

Page 41

...of his country and wisdom on the throne well, even to
the point of illusion! _Plaudite...

Page 42

...and influential persons,
expressing and tyrannically enforcing without any feeling of shame,
_their hoc est ridiculum, hoc...

Page 43

...above the
other; well then--so he reasons with himself--let _us_ in our turn
tempt chance and fortune!...

Page 44

...a people is, but what appears
to them foreign, strange, monstrous, and outlandish. The laws concern
themselves...

Page 45

...can no longer tire of gazing at the surface and at the
variegated, tender, tremulous skin...

Page 46

...men and
periods are so much separated from one another, as by the different
degrees of knowledge...

Page 47

...me the real "distress of the
present":--but perhaps this remedy already sounds too cruel, and would
itself...

Page 48

...Know of us.--_That which we know of ourselves and have
in our memory is not so...

Page 49

...of the dream_.


55.

_The Ultimate Nobility of Character._--What then makes a person
"noble"? Certainly not that he...

Page 50

...know what to make of
themselves--and so they paint the misfortune of others on the wall;
they...

Page 51

...and _operates_ as the essence! What a fool he would be who
would think it enough...

Page 52

...of safety!


60.

_Women and their Effect in the Distance._--Have I still ears? Am I
only ear, and...

Page 53

..."I
honour this pride of the wise and independent man, but I should have
honoured his humanity...

Page 54

...answered: "Man's attribute is will, woman's
attribute is willingness--such is the law of the sexes, verily!...

Page 55

...here they are intended
to remain ignorant to the very backbone:--they are intended to have
neither eyes,...

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...three days and three nights to brand it on thy
memory:--thus wilt thou never again beget...

Page 57

...a joyful _tempo!_
Virtuous intellects, therefore, are needed--ah! I want to use the
least ambiguous word,--_virtuous stupidity_...

Page 58

...him, and
are so hurt because we surmise that he believed he had to lower himself
on...

Page 59

...inclination for it, which
distinguished them more than anything else from non-Greeks. And so they
required good...

Page 60

...And fine talking
was arrived at by Sophocles!--pardon me this heresy!--It is very
different with _serious opera:_...

Page 61

...pure
logic requires; hence the little dose of irrationality in all French
_esprit_.--The social sense of the...

Page 62

...same time represent the doctrine of instinctive morality,
draw this conclusion: "Granted that utility has been...

Page 63

...the recipe of this medical
art. By means of it Terpander quieted a tumult, Empedocles calmed
a...

Page 64

...person became almost
a God. Such a fundamental feeling no longer allows itself to be
fully eradicated,--and...

Page 65

...their wines. But what is
their drink and their drunkenness to _me!_ Does the inspired one...

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...joint, and when every instant something
may originate "out of nothing." He draws his resources best...

Page 67

...festive-path
of humanity, as tokens of remembrance, and monuments of high and happy
moments. One now seeks...

Page 68

...which otherwise this century is not suited, owing to lack
of poetry, as we have indicated....

Page 69

...a violent,
penitential passion, and _in this state_ he put on the raiment of the
populace as...

Page 70

...emotion always drowns the spirit; perhaps because it is stronger
than in the former. But he...

Page 71

...secret
relationships of that kind there may have been, Shakespeare cast
himself on the ground and felt...

Page 72

...causes of the phenomenon
of the will at such a time and at such a place,"...

Page 73

...counterpart and complement of human knowledge and science.
And not only is he allured thereto by...

Page 74

...It is sufficient that his life is right in his own eyes, and
maintains its right,--the...

Page 75

...of the profession; on that account the technical expression, and
everything that betrays the specialist, is...

Page 76

...beside culture, as the masses
beside the nobility, as the good-natured man beside the good and...

Page 77

...the mouths of travellers among the
Italian populace, it still sounds very coarse, sylvan, and hoarse,...

Page 78

...accent which the ear of a foreigner
repudiates with aversion: but the Germans endure it,--they endure
themselves.


105.

_The...

Page 79

...approved of the Arts
and invented this sort of cult of the untrue, the insight into...

Page 80

...still to overcome his shadow!


109.

_Let us be on our Guard._--Let us be on our guard...

Page 81

...is no chance: for it is only where there is a
world of design that the...

Page 82

...and
all at the same time, with a special faculty for that reverse kind of
knowledge; they...

Page 83

...final question
concerning the conditions of life is here raised, and the first attempt
is here made...

Page 84

...follow--but we have not _grasped_ anything
thereby. The peculiarity, for example, in every chemical process seems
a...

Page 85

...saw
himself always imperfect; secondly,-he attributed to himself--imaginary
qualities; thirdly, he felt himself in a false position...

Page 86

...bad conscience in close proximity to it; and
the less independently a person acted, the more...

Page 87

...dogma of the "Equality of
men," so much the more also must the conception of a...

Page 88

...us save their
likeness and type, at least for the sake of knowledge.


123.

_Knowledge more than a...

Page 89

...a gentle reverie. But times will come when thou wilt
feel that it is infinite, and...

Page 90

...hitherto!"--Here the madman was
silent and looked again at his hearers; they also were silent and
looked...

Page 91

...and "Every effect again
implies a cause," appear as generalisations of several less general
propositions:--"Where there is...

Page 92

...the pious who have thought and elevation of their
own. But even these have their weary...

Page 93

...fact aimed at "Judaising" the whole world. To
what an extent this has succeeded in Europe...

Page 94

...autocracy to be taken from it, and had become contemptible:
in order not to feel this,...

Page 95

...a Jew.


141.

_Too Oriental._--What? A God who loves men provided that they believe
in him, and who...

Page 96

...as creatures who
all believed in one normal animal and ideal in their species, and
definitely translated...

Page 97

...in Germany: it was on
that account that the Reformation originated _here,_ as a sign that
even...

Page 98

...conscience of the herd opposed to them.


150.

_Criticism of Saints._--Must one then, in order to have...

Page 99

...so far as it is completed; I who have
first entwined the perplexities of morality about...

Page 100

...victory is that
it deprives the conqueror of the fear of defeat. "Why should I not...

Page 101

...For he follows
it in the belief that his laziness will find its advantage thereby:
he has...

Page 102

...virtue and intellect."
B: "And yet? And yet? That is spoken for the others; not for...

Page 103

...and not for the people.


194.

_The "Open-hearted" Man._--That man acts probably always from concealed
motives; for he...

Page 104

...enemy--that is a luxury
which the morality even of the highest-minded persons can rarely afford.


212.

_Not Letting...

Page 105

...And Nature is
evil! Let us therefore be natural!"--so reason secretly the great
aspirants after effect, who...

Page 106

...without envy, but there is no merit
therein: for he wants to conquer a land which...

Page 107

...Sufferers._--Great natures suffer otherwise than their
worshippers imagine; they suffer most severely from the ignoble, petty
emotions...

Page 108

...what after all are man's truths?--They are
his _irrefutable_ errors.


266.

_Where Cruelty is Necessary._--He who is great...

Page 109

..._Genoa,_ January 1882.


276.

_For the New Year._--I still live, I still think; I must still live,
for...

Page 110

...events has now reached
its highest point. We do not want either to think too highly...

Page 111

...one goal. But
then the almighty strength of our tasks forced us apart once more into
different...

Page 112

...become restless towards the end,
and seldom dip down into the sea with such proud, quiet...

Page 113

...and spoilers, ye knowing ones, as long as ye
cannot be rulers and possessors! The time...

Page 114

...seek your Orpheus!


287.

_Love of Blindness._--"My thoughts," said the wanderer to his shadow,
"ought to show me...

Page 115

...one's character--that is
a grand and a rare art! He who surveys all that his nature...

Page 116

...a considerable time: in the end I must say that I see
_countenances_ out of past...

Page 117

...same way as heretofore! Put
them at the head of your morality, and speak from morning...

Page 118

...much foresight, much concealment,
and reticence would constantly be necessary,--nothing but great and
useless losses of power!...

Page 119

...eve, and spreads a profound satisfaction
around me and in me, so that I have no...

Page 120

...of judging
which is most injurious _to knowledge:_ for precisely the good-will of
the knowing one ever...

Page 121

...furnish them with a
surface or skin which is not fully transparent: we should learn all
this...

Page 122

...life; he calls his
nature a _contemplative nature,_ and thereby overlooks the fact that
he himself is...

Page 123

...And only at this price do we purchase the most
precious pearl that the waves of...

Page 124

...again from morning
till evening, to dream of it at night, and think of nothing else...

Page 125

...and like those insensible persons, he also likes
well to have an invited public at the...

Page 126

...wept. Then he said: "Oh, this inclination and
impulse towards the true, the real, the non-apparent,...

Page 127

...not want to
keep to ourselves that which causes vexation? Would it not be more
advisable to...

Page 128

...Shall I have my storm in which
I perish, as Oliver Cromwell perished in his storm?...

Page 129

...pain I hear the commanding call of the ship's captain:
"Take in sail!" "Man," the bold...

Page 130

...and
society, out of his mind!--B: I want more; I am no seeker. I want to
create...

Page 131

...to perish from internal
distress and doubt when one inflicts great suffering and hears the cry
of...

Page 132

...recommendation of a severe radical cure, we may
be allowed to ask: Is our life really...

Page 133

..."afraid of letting
opportunities slip." "Better do anything whatever, than nothing"--this
principle also is a noose with...

Page 134

...this, and in general without any kind of applause? I doubt
it: and even as regards...

Page 135

..._one another,_ and how to cause pain:--the violent
sudden exhaustion which overtakes all thinkers, may have...

Page 136

...You
address yourself with your question to him who _is authorised_ to
answer, for I happen to...

Page 137

...circumstances call this and that your "duty" and
your "conscience": the knowledge _how moral judgments have...

Page 138

...of new tables of value of
our own:_--we will, however, brood no longer over the "moral...

Page 139

...condition, writes the history of his youth. In
fact, this is one aspect of the new...

Page 140

...which the compassionate person plays
the rôle of fate: he knows nothing of all the inner...

Page 141

...I shall soon die, only promise to die with
me"--I might promise it, just as--to select...

Page 142

...rarely united at the same time that I am inclined to believe
that the highest summit...

Page 143

...all the unspeakably small and great in thy life must come to thee
again, and all...

Page 144

...is again going to empty itself, and Zarathustra is again going
to be a man."--Thus began...

Page 145

...put out to sea in face of every danger;
every hazard is again permitted to the...

Page 146

...however, of
both being necessary, much trusting _and_ much distrusting, whence then
should science derive the absolute...

Page 147

...divine, except it be error, blindness, and
falsehood;--what if God himself turns out to be our...

Page 148

...repeating sincerely the popular superstition
of Christian Europe, that the characteristic of moral action consists
in abnegation,...

Page 149

...grown cold and hard in it) that things are not
at all divinely ordered in this...

Page 150

...of Belief._--How much _faith_ a person
requires in order to flourish, how much "fixed opinion" he...

Page 151

...extension, in an
extraordinary _malady of the will_ And in truth it has been so: both
religions...

Page 152

...nothing but
systematising brains--the formal part of the paternal occupation has
become its essence to them. The...

Page 153

...most
grossly in Darwinism, with its inconceivably one-sided doctrine of the
"struggle for existence"--), is probably owing...

Page 154

...from them, something
of the great _passion_ of the thinker, who lives and must live
continually in...

Page 155

...we Europeans cannot at all dispense with the masquerade
that is called clothing. But should not...

Page 156

...is to say, Rome, and the upper classes throughout the empire).
Buddha, in like manner, found...

Page 157

...and understand one another rapidly and
subtly, a surplus of the power and art of communication...

Page 158

...same time the man who is always
more acutely self-conscious; it is only as a social...

Page 159

...What do the people really understand by knowledge?
what do they want when they seek "knowledge"?...

Page 160

...to enforce) a definite _rôle_ on almost
all male Europeans, their so-called callings; some have the...

Page 161

...men thereupon springs up, which cannot grow in more stable,
more restricted eras--or is left "at...

Page 162

...as an event and an
evidence of the "Greek soul"? Or would the reverse perhaps be...

Page 163

...all Latin peoples) instinctively attribute
to becoming, to evolution, a profounder significance and higher value
than to...

Page 164

...to a moral order in the world and a moral final purpose; to
explain personal experiences...

Page 165

...fare, especially on account of his
_elegantia psychologica,_ which, it seems to me, could alleviate even
the...

Page 166

...all its length and breadth
was the indignation of the simple against something "complicated."
To speak cautiously,...

Page 167

...repudiated the
_rule_ of the _homines religiosi_; he consequently brought about
precisely the same thing within the...

Page 168

...other hand (by means of books to which he has no
right, or more intellectual society...

Page 169

...have learned to distinguish
the cause of an action generally from the cause of an action...

Page 170

...circumstances)
had again and again to pass themselves off and represent themselves
as different persons,--thus having gradually...

Page 171

...and discipline), to which all coming millenniums will look back
with envy and awe as a...

Page 172

..._not_ exist on the other side an equal _pathos,_ an equal
desire for renunciation: for if...

Page 173

...example, so that he may
begin to sweat out his self-complacency; or to seize a tuft...

Page 174

...an ink-bottle with compressed
belly and head bent over the paper: oh, how quickly we are...

Page 175

...intellect! And have so many opinions which cannot
be expressed in money value! And because you...

Page 176

...from music generally. I believe it wants to have _relief:_
so that all animal functions should...

Page 177

...for our music?"--)


369.

_Juxtapositions in us._--Must we not acknowledge to ourselves, we
artists, that there is a...

Page 178

...music as the
expression of a Dionysian power in the German soul: I thought I heard
in...

Page 179

...valuing to the imperative _want_ behind it.--In
regard to all æsthetic values I now avail myself...

Page 180

...time yet! say, to be modest, until 1901--, it is also our
distinction; we should not...

Page 181

...a species
of vampirism. At the sight of such figures even as Spinoza, do you
not feel...

Page 182

...that fashion to a ready-reckoner exercise
and calculation for stay-at-home mathematicians? We should not, above
all, seek...

Page 183

...once more become "infinite" to us: in
so far we cannot dismiss the possibility that it...

Page 184

...them that my secret
wisdom and _gaya scienza_ is especially to be laid to heart! For
their...

Page 185

...of our "love of mankind"; for that, a person of our stamp
is not enough of...

Page 186

...is--once more a _faith_ which urges you
thereto!...


378.

_"And once more Grow Clear."_--We, the generous and rich...

Page 187

...compare it with other
earlier or future moralities, one must do as the traveller who wants...

Page 188

...my own case,--I do not desire that either my ignorance, or
the vivacity of my temperament,...

Page 189

...it cannot be denied that amongst
other things we are also learned. We have different needs,...

Page 190

...a pity; but it is
unavoidable that we should look on the worthiest aims and hopes...

Page 191

...hear is at least new; and if you do not understand it, if you
misunderstand the...

Page 192

... Chirped out the pecker, mocking me.

Like to an...

Page 193

...the South!

For I could no longer stay,
To...

Page 194

...a stranger,
And he, too, hates the old:
...

Page 195

...the swell
We had slumbered, oh, so well!



AN...

Page 196

...sinks the moon away,
The stars are wan, and flare...

Page 197

...her sins with anger's flail?"

Pour poppies now,
...

Page 198

... Were I for ages set
...

Page 199

...Swifter than with boat or wing!

Through my dreams your whistle sounded,
...

Page 200

...of visage bold.

Off with those who spoil earth's gladness,
...