The Joyful Wisdom

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...

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... _FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE_

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... T. N. FOULIS

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... 29

BOOK SECOND...

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...difficulty overcome, it is
hoped, by the choice of Miss Petre and Mr Cohn,—but it cannot...

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...and frigidity in the midst of youth, this advent
of grey hairs at the wrong time,...

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...the _pressure_ of sickness? This
is the important question for psychologists: and here experiment is
possible. We...

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...so much the more valuable (as we have said) as
symptoms of the bodily constitution, its...

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...we are burned as it were with green
wood, that compels us philosophers to descend into...

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...liquors! How the theatrical cry of passion now pains our ear,
how strange to our taste...

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...of forms, of tones, and of words? And
precisely on that account—artists?

RUTA, near GENOA

_Autumn, 1886._

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Footnote 1:

...

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... ...

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... I recall no pain endured!
...

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... ...

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... ...

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... Harsh and...

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... ...

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... ...

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... 21.

...

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... ...

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... ...

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... Now comes the test! Keep cool—eyes bright and...

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... How could I without burning run
...

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... _The Slave._

...

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... ...

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... Yet now...

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... _In Summer._

...

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...origin
...

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... ...

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...the glaring sun, afraid,
...

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... ...

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... ...

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... Me with good humour you'll endure.


...

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... ...

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... And write in floods of flowing ink.
...

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...hour by hour was pain and error sheer:
...

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...would but dim the light
...

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...the
race has perhaps died out many millenniums ago, and now belongs to the
things which are...

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...passion of
spirit; it has then a brilliant train of motives about it, and tries
with all...

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...exists; his species cannot flourish without
periodically confiding in life! Without the belief in _reason in...

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...even to make merry over him to the extent of
weariness—that is what I regard as...

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...his head, and one henceforth
speaks of "passions." (Here and there to be sure, the antithesis...

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...means
of arms, by upsetting boundary-stones, by violations of piety most of
all: but also by new...

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...very numerous
class of those opponents wherever interest teaches subjection, while
repute and honour seem to forbid...

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...to come to light! Hitherto all that has given colour to existence
has lacked a history:...

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... 8.

_Unconscious Virtues._—All qualities in a man of...

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...hours of eruption:—how near or
how distant this is, nobody of course knows, not even the...

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...it is a danger to the organism:
all the better if it be then thoroughly tyrannised...

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..._capacity for
enjoyment_. In fact, one can further the one as well as the other goal
_by...

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...most susceptible to the sense of power, and eager for it, will
prefer to impress the...

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...distant coast excites our covetousness: the possession for
the most part becomes smaller through possessing. Our...

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...for one another has yielded to a new desire and covetousness, to
a _common_, higher thirst...

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...us, and even if we wanted to come to one another, we
could no longer do...

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... 19.

_Evil._—Test the life of...

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...diligence; the youth is honoured and regretted who has
"worn himself out by work," because one...

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...at the same
time deprives the organs of the refinement by virtue of which alone an
enjoyment...

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...to
arrange for this day the business and fêtes of our most gracious lord,
who at present...

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... 23.

_The Characteristics of Corruption._—Let...

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...only grant so much—namely, that cruelty now becomes
more refined, and its older forms are henceforth...

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...tyrant or the Cæsar understands the rights of the
Individual even in his excesses, and has...

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...things to Chinese
conditions and to a Chinese "happiness," with their measures for the
amelioration and security...

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...further and higher than all
men of affirmation—he _throws away many things_ that would burden his
flight,...

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...those laws
ought to exist, merely for the sake of not acknowledging to themselves
that they had...

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...exercising himself daily in the
art; precisely as formerly in the period of uncivilised humanity,
everyone was...

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...so long a time. It is now only, quite late, and after an
immense self-conquest, that...

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...finita est!_—The thought of
the dying Nero: _qualis artifex pereo!_ was also the thought of the
dying...

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... ...

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...all those forms and attributes of a _superior race_, which alone
make persons interesting; if they...

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...toil and
trouble in so far as these are associated with pleasure, and they want
the severest...

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...afraid above all things of the orgiastic and Dionysian
spirit with which the women of Southern...

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...human
laws and conceptions, that we are really astonished _how persistently_
the results of science hold their...

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...much separated from one another, as by the different
degrees of knowledge of distress which they...

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..."distress of the present":—but perhaps this remedy
already sounds too cruel, and would itself be reckoned...

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...even the best
arguments for a person or cause!—It is thus that the gregarious instinct
speaks in...

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...sentient being, continues to meditate,
love, hate, and reason in me,—I have suddenly awoke in the...

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...what has been most
preservative of the species, and generally the _rule_ in mankind
hitherto, has been...

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...pride and an ornament out
of your emptiness, ye call yourselves realists and give to understand
that...

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...to _annihilate_ that which virtually passes for the
world—namely, so-called "reality"! It is only as creators...

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...but as our
plains, as our places of safety!


...

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...Honour of Friendship._—That the sentiment of friendship was regarded
by antiquity as the highest sentiment, higher...

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...present is often accepted without putting the
recipient under such deep obligation as the giver supposed,—a...

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... ...

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...that all the "honour" of woman is at stake; what would one not
forgive them in...

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...the
beautiful sex.


...

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...delight in human unreason. It is not truth and certainty that
is the antithesis of the...

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...and passionate in the
same kind of music or romance? "The animal has its rights like...

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...like reality in itself.—Perhaps there is merit of a similar
kind in the religion which commanded...

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...stage, as we endure that other unnaturalness, the
_singing_ passion, and willingly endure it, thanks to...

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...courage to express
fully their extreme contempt for words: a little additional insolence in
Rossini, and he...

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...logic requires; hence,
the little dose of irrationality in all French _esprit_.—The social
sense of the Greeks...

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...name of the poet and put
their own in its place—not with the feeling of theft,...

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...of poetry. Among the Pythagoreans
it made its appearance as a philosophical doctrine and as an...

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...it: they could make labour
go on magically; they could compel a God to appear, to...

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... ...

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...the so-called higher
culture!


...

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...know it.


...

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... 91.

_Precaution._—Alfieri, as is...

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...to be called masters of prose.


...

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...his life, his genius, and alas! most of all, perhaps, the
paternal blood in his veins,...

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...his brain to compel
his high intellectuality to reveal itself. The other attempts, indeed,
now and then...

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...without peer,—if one really loves
freedom as the freedom of great souls, and if _this_ freedom...

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...palpable. What are the German followers of _Schopenhauer_
still accustomed to receive first of all from...

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...an artist: he made a
mistake in the interpretation of the characters he created, and
misunderstood the...

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...least Wagner's hatred of science, which manifests itself in
his preaching, has certainly not been inspired...

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...contempt. Whoever goes in new paths and has led many persons
therein, discovers with astonishment how...

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...this belief again and again is the purpose of
philology. It presupposes that the rare men...

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...Goethe conceived and characterised him, Goethe, the
exceptional German, for whom a music of equal rank...

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...selectness of tone is spreading
among the former admirers of the chancery style, and that the...

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... ...

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...heart."—The innovator laughed to himself and
threatened the disciple with his finger. "This kind of discipleship,"
said...

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...it! How could we dispense with Art for that purpose, how
could we dispense with the...

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...the other hand, is to all
eternity chaos; not by the absence of necessity, but in...

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...almost
the property and stock of the human species, are, for example, the
following:—that there are enduring...

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...lower degree of _utility_ for life; and likewise
where new maxims proved to be, not in...

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...itself—first created the
whole basis of logic. It was just so (in order that the conception...

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...which we isolate
a few portions;—just as we always observe a motion as isolated points,
and therefore...

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...always imperfect; secondly, he attributed to himself imaginary
qualities; thirdly, he felt himself in a false...

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...thought was regarded as discomfort personified. While we feel law and
regulation as constraint and loss,...

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...his social
intercourse. Such beings maintain themselves best when they insert
themselves in an alien organism; if...

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...might be among the conditions
of life.


...

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...surplus of leisure, except
to continue reading, collecting, arranging, observing and narrating;
their "scientific impulse" is their...

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... 125.

_The Madman._—Have you ever heard of the madman who...

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...prodigious event is still on its
way, and is travelling,—it has not yet reached men's ears....

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...anything happens,—and even still uses
instinctively as a piece of atavism of remotest origin. The
propositions, "No...

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...without grace) on their fingers; or honour Vishnu with his
thousand names of invocation, Allah with...

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...against Christianity.


...

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...done
to him, except in the point of honour. Every sin is an infringement of
respect, a...

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...They thus
elevated intentionally the tower of the royal power more and more into
the clouds, and...

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... ...

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...believed that it _had_
this one and ultimate norm. But above himself, and outside of himself,
in...

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...also impels, however,
in its more subtle after-effects to modes of thought and feeling which
operate narcotically....

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...lacking; but
that night brought the storm which put an end to all.


...

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... ...

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...tempter! What passion
was there when people saw demons lurking close at hand! What philosophy
was there...

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...that a person resists the whole
spirit of his age, stops it at the door, and...

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...while in the distance the
magnitude and importance of all things diminish.


...

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... ...

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... ...

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... 177.

_On "Educational Matters."_—In Germany...

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...of the profoundest happiness, and no other
sorrow: there has not hitherto been such a musician.


...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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...could be
formed out of you? And without that—is not all your labour barbaric
sculpturing? A blasphemy...

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... ...

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... ...

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... 235.

_Spirit and Character._—Many a one attains his...

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... ...

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... ...

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... 253.

_Always at Home._—One day we...

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... 260.

_One times One._—One only is always in the wrong, but with...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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...gives me a melancholy happiness to live in
the midst of this confusion of streets, of...

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...to one another is the law to which we are _subject_:
just by that shall we...

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...it the
fifth act of a tragedy or of a state affair. The masters of the...

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...men with
their own holidays, their own work-days, and their own periods of
mourning; accustomed to command...

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...peace, thou desirest the eternal recurrence of war and
peace:—man of renunciation, wilt thou renounce in...

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...happiest chance is unable to
throw together. Perhaps that very state which has hitherto entered into
our...

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...does not permit of being taken
away, has been concealed, there it has been re-interpreted into...

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...centuries, and not for the
passing hour: they were well disposed to life, however ill-disposed they
may...

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...head of
your morality, and speak from morning till night of the happiness of
virtue, of repose...

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...his best
art would neither be properly advantageous to anyone else, nor a delight
to himself, that...

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...as an
invaluable means for getting a knowledge of _many_ things and various
conditions, to the very...

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...individual _to give_
to his character and business _the appearance_ of unalterableness,—even
when they are not so...

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... 298.

_A Sigh._—I caught this notion on the way, and...

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...age as an exercise and a
prelude, in like manner as the prelude and preparation of...

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...actually
and unceasingly _make_ something which does not yet exist: the whole
eternally increasing world of valuations,...

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...riddles are the dangers of the happiest
ones!—


...

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...and to do it again from morning till
evening, and dream of it at night, and...

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...the rest—that is to say, by far
the greater part of experience—because it would be too...

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... ...

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...its soul also
seems to be full of secrets and of longing for treasure-seeking. Thus
live the...

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...nature
of things, which is that defects and errors should give pleasure!—To be
sure there were once...

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...out as a light does, not first blown out by the wind, but grown tired
and...

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... 318.

_Wisdom...

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...for reason, want to look as carefully into
our experiences, as in the case of a...

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... ...

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...because mankind as a whole has for centuries listened too
eagerly to those teachers, something of...

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... ...

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...it savage
also, spreading over it a strange lack of intellectuality. One is now
ashamed of repose:...

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..._otium_ and _bellum_ is
there nobility and honour:" so rang the voice of ancient prejudice!


...

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...all at
once? A result of the diverging and opposite impulses of desiring to
deride, lament and...

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...spell and charm more and more, and does not
cease until we have become its humble...

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...further conscience for it? Do you know nothing of
an intellectual conscience? A conscience behind your...

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...that "as I think on this matter, so must everyone think"? Admire
rather your _selfishness_ therein!...

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...or in _contradiction_ to it.
And therefore, three cheers for physics! And still louder cheers for
that...

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...the indecisive battle which has brought him wounds and
the loss of a friend. But to...

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...the
closing up of old wounds, the repudiation of whole periods of the
past—none of these things...

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...Indeed, there is even a secret seduction in all this
awakening of compassion, and calling for...

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...am inclined to believe that the
highest summit of all that is good, be it work,...

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... 341.

_The Heaviest Burden._—What if a demon crept after thee into thy
loneliest loneliness some...

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...the wise have once more
become joyous in their folly, and the poor happy in their...

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... 343.

_What our Cheerfulness Signifies._—The most important of...

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...lies open before us; perhaps never
before did such an "open sea" exist.—


...

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...whether the greater
advantage is on the side of absolute distrust, or of absolute
trustfulness? In case,...

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...is divine.... But what if this itself always
becomes more untrustworthy, what if nothing any longer...

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...done everything to encourage the inclination and talent for
this kind of history—in vain, as it...

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...we wanted
simply to call ourselves in older phraseology, atheists, unbelievers, or
even immoralists, we should still...

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..._by us_? Have we not just thereby become liable to
a suspicion of an opposition between...

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...at present to call this aspect _la vérité
vraie_), or in Nihilism in the St Petersburg...

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...in a learned
book or scientific treatise the intellectual _idiosyncrasy_ of the
learned man—all of them have...

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...lamentably _déraisonnable_ race, who, even at the
present day, must always have their "heads washed"[11] in...

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...contemplative
natures, that is to say, the more malign and suspicious men, who with
long continued distrust...

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...can _get rid_ of its secrets, cares, and worse things (for
the man who "communicates himself"...

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...with it). The European disguises himself _in morality_
because he has become a sick, sickly, crippled...

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...return of earthly ill (that is to
say, labour and activity generally),—this "understanding" was his
genius. The...

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...in like manner the
orators, preachers, and authors: all of them men who come at the...

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...to the individual existence of man, but rather to the
social and gregarious nature in him;...

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...want when they seek "knowledge"? Nothing more than that
what is strange is to be traced...

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...356.

_In what Manner Europe will always become "more Artistic."_—Providing a
living still enforces even in the...

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...in what respect he plays a rôle, and to what extent
he _can_ be a stage-player,...

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...thank German
intellects: are they in any allowable sense to be counted also to the
credit of...

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...with Leibnitz that "our
inner world is far richer, ampler, and more concealed"; as Germans we
are...

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...what has really gained the victory over
the Christian God—, Christian morality itself, the conception of
veracity,...

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...truth as to how far a person could bamboozle the Germans
themselves in the age of...

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...strangest is that those
who have exerted themselves most to retain and preserve Christianity,
have been precisely...

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...was psychologically right: but thereby he
practically did away with the Christian priest himself, whose
profoundest utility...

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...circumstances a _nobler_ institution than the State.—


...

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...a means of concealment_? Sometimes, perhaps, from the point
of view of education which hallows so...

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...sure enough, but—not a steersman? We still require a
criticism of the conception of "purpose."


...

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...of actors, a
genuine breeding-place for actors; and in fact the question is very
pertinent just now:...

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...which was to be _mistress of the world_.—


...

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...and as nature, is to all eternity something
"unmoral."—_Fidelity_ is accordingly included in woman's love, it
follows...

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... ...

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...of the
room, betray themselves.—These were my feelings as I was closing a
straightforward, learned book, thankful,...

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...mastership
and ability, and repudiate with the most relentless scorn everything of
a make-believe, half-genuine, dressed-up, virtuoso,...

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...and my bowels also protest? Do I not become hoarse unawares
under its influence? And then...

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..._becomes_ a neighbour...." (I have forgotten to mention
what my enlightened Wagnerian answered to my physiological...

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...some gross
errors and exaggerations, but at any rate with _hope_ in my heart. I
recognised—who knows...

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...of existence—for
logic soothes and gives confidence;—in short he would need a certain
warm, fear-dispelling narrowness and...

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...or as Wagnerian music:—romantic pessimism, the last
_great_ event in the destiny of our civilisation. (That...

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...representatives of the present and of
the future in philosophy,—_not_ according to theory, however, but in
_praxis_,...

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...interrogation. Besides, their courage, and
similarly their outlook, does not reach so far,—and above all, their
need,...

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...the _worth_ of a music with
reference to how much it could be counted, calculated, or...

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...of the "burnt child," of the
disillusioned idealist; but one may also see in it another...

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...home in this frail, broken-down, transition period; and as
regards the "realities" thereof, we do not...

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...perhaps it were "the Truth": a question for philosophers)? No,
we do not love Mankind! On...

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...of the streets like open fountains and would hinder
no one from drinking from us: we...

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... ...

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..._want_ to be understood by "anyone." A
distinguished intellect and taste, when it wants to communicate...

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...I am ashamed of it;
to be sure there are likewise hours in which I am...

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...enough
shipwrecked and brought to grief, nevertheless, as said above, healthier
than people would like to admit,...

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...me, "away, away with this raven-black music. Is it not clear
morning round about us? And...

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... God...

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... Each syllable the bird went after,
...

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...whole company, line on line,
...

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... On the purple sail of a boat;
...

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... And...

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... Is fain with me...

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..."good day,"
...

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...Thoughts of rest I 'gan forswear,
...

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... Cleaving the sky with wings unmoved—what force
...

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... Could her vows be hollow?
...

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... "SOULS THAT LACK...

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... Well, I will help you, as I can,
...

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... Why scourge her sins with anger's flail?"

...

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... Once more, St Mark, thy pigeons meet my gaze,
...

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...night!
'Tis early for your pealing,...

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...swiftly changed to twain,
And Zarathustra...

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...glorious,
...

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... All that's joyful shall be true!

...

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... Blow...

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... ...