The Case Of Wagner, Nietzsche Contra Wagner, and Selected Aphorisms.

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...*Friedrich Nietzsche*

...

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...are apt to be deceived, by their virulent
and forcible tone, into believing that the whole...

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...a magnifying glass in order to make a general, but
elusive and intricate fact more clear...

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...to step aside from
the general track now trodden by Europeans. And what happened? Wagner
began to...

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...even the encouragement, of that
decadence and degeneration which is now rampant in Europe; and it...

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...early works just mentioned, we find the following
passage--"In the second of the two essays [Wagner...

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...his history was that of a
double devotion--to Wagner on the one hand, and to his...

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...it in the prefatory note. If we were to be credulous here, we
should moreover be...

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..."human-all-too-human," but they still maintain that
there are divine qualities in his music. However distasteful the...

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...structures into a quivering and fluid jet, in order to
give adequate expression to the painful...

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...of the modern
world for actors, sorcerers, bewilderers and idealists who are able to
conceal the ill-health...

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...of himself? To
overcome his age in himself, to become "timeless." With what then does the
philosopher...

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...it, we must first be Wagnerites.{~HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS~}




1.


Yesterday--would you believe it?--I heard _Bizet's_ masterpiece for the
twentieth...

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...thought, or am not aware how much thought I
really do give it. For quite other...

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...cry of Don Jose with which the work
ends:

"Yes, it is I who have killed her,
I--my...

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...old females prefer to be saved by
chaste young men? (the case of Kundry). Or that...

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...most famous ones, the love
is no more than a refined form of _parasitism_, a making...

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...who is saved--Half his lifetime Wagner believed in the
_Revolution_ as only a Frenchman could have...

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...a
socialistic Utopia in which "all will be well"; now gets something else to
do. She must...

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...itself can be a stimulus to life but one must be healthy enough
for such a...

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...this
it were also more profitable, more effective, more convincing, more
exalting, more secure, more _Wagnerian_?{~HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS~}...

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...of passion. Nothing is cheaper than passion! All
the virtues of counterpoint may be dispensed with,...

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...must be on our guard. We must control our ambition, which would bid us
found new...

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...smallest structure, and the
remainder left almost lifeless. Everywhere paralysis, distress, and
numbness, or hostility and chaos...

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...including that which has become so outside
the theatre, is in bad taste and spoils taste....

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...as his dominating instinct has
not been divined.

Wagner was _not_ instinctively a musician. And this he...

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...in economy, as _prudent_ amphitryons. Nobody can
equal them in the art of providing a princely...

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...may give the
impression of freedom (the principle of the smallest expenditure of
energy). Now the very...

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...women, and then to offer them
to Wagner in this mythologised form as a libretto. Indeed,...

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...anything else than a means": this
was his theory, but above all it was the only...

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...with bad weather, with German
weather! Wotan is their God, but Wotan is the God of...

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...since Wagner rules there the most difficult things are expected,
blame is severe, praise very scarce,--the...

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...was a gloomy hate throughout almost
three-quarters of Wagner's life. The resistance which he met with...

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...wish to pose as judges _in rebus
musicis et musicantibus_. Secondly: an ever increasing indifference
towards severe,...

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...and disease are united here, reaches such a height, that it casts
so to speak a...

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...is fatal for women. What medically speaking is a
female Wagnerite? It seems to me that...

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...and fall to the depths.
He possessed the ingenuousness of decadence: this constituted his
superiority. He believed...

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...dreams
or mourns over himself in private--in this respect he is modern;--he becomes
cold, we no longer...

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...value of _persons_. A philosopher feels that he wants to
wash his hands after he has...

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...Incidentally, I
admire the modesty of Christians who go to Bayreuth. As for myself, I
could _not_...

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...of Wagner" is a
_windfall_--this essay, as you observe, was inspired by gratitude.





NIETZSCHE _CONTRA_ WAGNER


THE BRIEF...

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...or sign; verily as the Orpheus of all secret misery he is
greater than anyone, and...

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...would fain rest its head in the haunts and
abysses of perfection; for this reason I...

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...witness.{~HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS~} In the theatre one becomes
mob, herd, woman, Pharisee, electing cattle, patron, idiot--Wagnerite:
there, the...

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...think that all music
is the music of the "marble statue"?--that all music should, so to...

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...that at
this very moment we are living in a reaction, _in the heart itself_ of...

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...and negation,--in him evil, purposelessness and ugliness,
seem just as allowable as they are in nature--because...

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...French are "barbarians,"--as for me, if I
had to find the _blackest_ spot on earth, where...

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...passages to all that seduces, lures,
constrains or overthrows; born enemies of logic and of straight...

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..._of tragedy_, in a way which befitted him and his dignity,
that is to say, with...

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...him farewell: but the proof
of this came only too soon. Richard Wagner, ostensibly the most...

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...mission, whenever we begin
to make things too easy for ourselves. Curious and terrible at the...

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...they now appear, and were perhaps obliged to be: men of the
moment, sensuous, absurd, versatile,...

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...Hamlet's case: and then folly itself can
be the mask of an unfortunate and alas! all...

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...suspicion_
as well, a man returns as though born again, he has a new skin, he...

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...quite
improper,"--a hint to philosophers.{~HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS~} The shame with which Nature has
concealed herself behind riddles and...

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...love with art, passionately in love, and in the whole of
existence saw nothing else than...

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...men--this is the reverse of the medal.



17.


Our youth was up in arms against the _soberness_...

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...He saturates the latter
with himself, pretends to adorn him ({~GREEK SMALL LETTER KAPPA~}{~GREEK SMALL LETTER...

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...to the Semitic race! I
believe that the Jews approach Wagner's art with more understanding than
the...

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...also makes the baroque artist like Wagner.



50.


Wagner's art is calculated to appeal to short-sighted people--one...

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...the ancients which is truer to human nature.



52.


Wagner reminds one of lava which blocks its...

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...alarmed at the thought of how much pleasure I could find in Wagner's
style, which is...

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...by Houston Stuart Chamberlain (translated by
G. A. Hight), pp....

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... any point which is vouched for by Wagner alone. He was not...