The Case of Wagner Complete Works, Volume 8

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...(Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)





THE CASE OF WAGNER

BY

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE


I

THE CASE OF WAGNER

II

NIETZSCHE...

Page 1

...from
cover to cover and line for line is sincerity itself--we learn what
Wagner actually meant to...

Page 2

...with him.
Whereas, theretofore, he had identified Wagner's ideals with his own,
it now dawned upon him...

Page 3

...To speak of a
certain class of music as being compatible with the decline of culture,
therefore,...

Page 4

...statement I made in my
preface to "Thoughts out of Season," vol. i., and which I...

Page 5

...who complain of Nietzsche's "morbid and uncontrollable
recantations and revulsions of feeling," have overlooked even the...

Page 6

...out the reason. Did
Wagner--in the belief that genius was always immoral--wish to pose as
an immoral...

Page 7

...18 of this work, and also with a knowledge of Wagner's music, it
becomes one of...

Page 8

...themselves.

"I am just as much a child of my age as Wagner--_i.e.,_ I am a
_decadent"_...

Page 9

...others
and himself. Thus he remained ignorant about himself all his life;
for there was, as Nietzsche...

Page 10

...do not suspect
that some of this greatness is reflected in his life-task.

ANTHONY M. LUDOVICI.

LONDON, JULY...

Page 11

...all that was contemporary: and as the highest wish, Zarathustra's
eye, an eye which surveys the...

Page 12

...It is lovable, it does not sweat. "All that
is good is easy, everything divine runs...

Page 13

...logic even in passion, from him it has the direct
line, _inexorable_ necessity; but what it...

Page 14

...I have my
reasons for this principle ("Beyond Good and Evil," pp. 216 _et seq._).
The return...

Page 15

...too sure of the spouse
one actually marries (for the third time, the case of "Lohengrin").
"Tristan...

Page 16

...and strives for virtuosity in
something greatly inferior, while it renounces more lofty aims."_ But
the most...

Page 17

...He tilts irreverently
at old god-heads. His principal undertaking, however, is to emancipate
woman,--"to deliver Brunnhilda." ......

Page 18

...cause!

I should like to open the window a little. Air! More air!--

The fact that people...

Page 19

...more modern than this thorough morbidness, this
dilatoriness and excessive irritability of the nervous machinery,
Wagner is...

Page 20

...we do want to make them wonder vaguely. This much still lies
within our powers.

In regard...

Page 21

...in the clouds, let us harangue eternity, let us be
careful to group great symbols all...

Page 22

...him but a sport of nature, an arbitrary mood, a chapter of
accidents. He was not...

Page 23

...create any
style whatsoever, is quite in keeping with that daring habit, which
stuck to him throughout...

Page 24

...know nothing about music,--and yet Wagner gets the mastery of
them. Wagner's art presses with the...

Page 25

...of music--suffice. Wagner never calculates as a musician
with a musician's conscience: all he strains after...

Page 26

...out of it he draws his characters. The whole of what
remains to be done follows...

Page 27

...be free. What
does Wagner do? He emancipates the oldest woman on earth, Erda: "Step
up, aged...

Page 28

...could do much more than he does; but his strong principles
prevent him.

Everything that Wagner _can_...

Page 29

...was _Hegel's_ heir.... Music as "Idea."--

And how well Wagner was understood!--The same kind of man...

Page 30

...to forget
the orchestra:--he "delivered" them from monotony.... The movement
that Wagner created has spread even to...

Page 31

...is outdone by him. The note of a Torinese).


12.

This view, that our actors have become...

Page 32

...of Wagner. It is only
quite recently that the Germans have overcome a sort of dread...

Page 33

...nothing dangerous
to life, nothing that slanders the world in the realm of spirit, which
has not...

Page 34

...degeneration of the feeling
for rhythm. What the Wagnerite calls rhythmical is what I call, to
use...

Page 35

...I say. The _Kreuz-Zeitung_ has brought this
home to me, not to speak of the _Litterarisches...

Page 36

...a riddle to me: until one day through an accident,
almost, I discovered that he affected...

Page 37

...Old
Masters,--all this only acts as a palliative, or, more strictly
speaking, has but an illusory effect,...

Page 38

...abuse. These antithetical forms
in the optics of values, are _both_ necessary: they are different
points of...

Page 39

...the Christian
gentleman. This _innocence_ in contradiction, this "clean conscience"
in falsehood, is rather modern _par excellence,_...

Page 40

...less pride than he.
Like Victor Hugo he remained true to himself even in his biography,--he
remained...

Page 41

...fallen asunder, and at every moment something may
spring out of nonentity. He is happiest of...

Page 42

...circulation
also protest? Are not my intestines also troubled? And do I not become
hoarse unawares? ......

Page 43

...oneself at home when one goes to Bayreuth, one
gives up all right to one's own...

Page 44

...(as
performing musical artists now seem to believe), under all
circumstances to attain to a _haut-relief_ which...

Page 45

...the resurrection of these
Scandinavian monsters with a thirst for ecstatic sensuality and
spiritualisation--the whole of this...

Page 46

...Now Wagner responds quite as well as
Schopenhauer to the twofold cravings of these people,--they both...

Page 47

...decadence,
the will to nonentity in art as well as in morality.



WHERE WAGNER IS AT HOME.

Even...

Page 48

...a _universal literary_ culture,--most of them
writers, poets, mediators and minglers of the senses and the...

Page 49

...of his
life, Richard Wagner undoubtedly wished to set to music and to put on
the stage,...

Page 50

...a work of rancour, of revenge, of the most secret
concoction of poisons with which to...

Page 51

...That hidden and dominating thing, for which for long
ages we have had no name, until...

Page 52

...was only a poor
sacrificial animal! _Success_ has always been the greatest liar--and
the "work" itself, the...

Page 53

...forms of disguise is Epicurism,
along with a certain ostentatious boldness of taste which takes
suffering lightly,...

Page 54

...henceforward to ask more, deeper, sterner,
harder, more wicked, and more silent questions, than anyone has...

Page 55

..."at all costs": this madness of adolescence, "the love of truth";
we are now too experienced,...

Page 56

...the engraving which was my creation. My longing to see real
men and their motives, received...

Page 57

...always have to credit Wagner with the fact that in the second
half of the nineteenth...

Page 58

...from which he can draw _fresh_ ideas. Hatred of all that which he
cannot approach: the...

Page 59

...envy, Beethoven's sublime resignation, Bach's
delicately transfigured spiritual life,--if steady work performed
without any thought of glory...

Page 60

...He weaves kindred sensations
into it in order to lend it the character of greatness. He...

Page 61

...is to say they _take the work to pieces._--But in this
way the kind of work...

Page 62

...his earliest days,
of having his say in the most important matters without a sufficient
knowledge of...

Page 63

...is
called the Ultramontane Party. The river which can thus flow over
mountains is Catholicism, towards which...

Page 64

...teaching to be propagated in the schools; and if,
where classical scholars were concerned, it was...

Page 65

...sprung from a primary discord: it is hard to live
through it Towards the end of...

Page 66

...But how otherwise are philologists to be produced?

The imitation of antiquity: is not this a...

Page 67

...then is to secure for philology the universally educative
results which it should bring about. The...

Page 68

...from becoming such. The greatest
obstacle, however, which stands in the way of these born philologists
is...

Page 69

...towards antiquity is apologetic, or
else dictated by the view that what our own age values...

Page 70

..."Your own salvation above everything"--that is what you
should say; and there are no institutions which...

Page 71

...statues in the Greek style in the presence of this
thought-less philistinism which would fain devour...

Page 72

...to be a teacher in the higher sense, not only
of all scientific men, but more...

Page 73

...and active desire, new and strange, which gives
rise to a productive conviction from day to...

Page 74

...of humanitarianism, whilst Hindoos and
Chinese are at all events more humane.

3. From the pretensions of...

Page 75

...the impression that antiquity in its highest sense
renders one "out of season"_ i.e., _an enemy...

Page 76

...sciences--for scientificality in other words; and
for that classical studies are necessary! What a wonderful jump!...

Page 77

...of the emulator."
Voltaire said: "If the admirers of Homer were honest, they would
acknowledge the boredom...

Page 78

...of learned man who was at the same time
a priest or something similar. Even in...

Page 79

...all
probability something like this: "Whether you have a right to summon
anyone here or not, I...

Page 80

...as if it were the most important of all aids to instruction, while
antiquity, generally speaking,...

Page 81

...enlightened of them
were several who could use their intellect only for childish tasks. It
is a...

Page 82

...time as if he were turning the matter over in his mind. At
last he said...

Page 83

...they were capable of
adapting themselves to other points of view and other circumstances
of life, then,...

Page 84

...Place of
the Study of Antiquity in Germany." There is no feeling for what should
be protected...

Page 85

...older, a desire for _real_ history would
be shown.



78

Inhumanity: even in the "Antigone," even in Goethe's...

Page 86

..._e.g.,_
scholarship.

5. Classical education is served out mixed up with Christianity.



85

It is now no longer a...

Page 87

...beauty, babblers and triflers,
...

Page 88

...are some factors which are very favourable
to the development of the individual. They do not,...

Page 89

...of
addressing it as a whole). Individuality raised to the highest power
through the polis. Envy, jealousy,...

Page 90

...went to pieces in politics. They were
compelled to take up a stand against their enemies:...

Page 91

...self-control: for example in a man like Socrates,
who was capable of everything evil.



121

Its noble sense...

Page 92

...read at all.


[Footnote 11: Karl Ottfried Müller (1797-1840), classical archæologist,
who devoted special attention to Greece.--TR.]

[Footnote...

Page 93

...astonishingly large. If any one
met with a misfortune, they would say of him: "Ah! no...

Page 94

...The hero-myth became
pan-Hellenic: a poet must have had a hand in that!



142

How _realistic_ the Greeks...

Page 95

...a pre-Greek condition of mankind: belief in witchcraft
in connection with all and everything, bloody sacrifices,...

Page 96

...State," they now call it, as
if _that_ had still to be propagated! He who does...

Page 97

...occupy themselves one day with the collective
account of antiquity and make up its balance-sheet. If...

Page 98

...it had to let itself be overcome
by the spirit of antiquity--for example, the idea of...

Page 99

...mastery--for
instance, a strict law of nature, the helplessness and superfluousness
of all gods, the strict conception...

Page 100

...to the ground as soon as these
assumptions are recognised to be errors. Our scientific assumptions
admit...

Page 101

...on the schools.

The study of the spirit of emulation (Renaissance, Goethe), and the
study of despair.

The...

Page 102

...the oldest antiquity, there is no contradiction: they support
and harmonise with one another. It is...

Page 103

...which cannot be imparted to youths!

The puerile character of philology: devised by teachers for pupils.



180

The...

Page 104

...Even at this early
stage the question will arise: was it absolutely necessary that this
should have...

Page 105

..."miracles" are not believed; only a "Providence" stands in
need of such things. There is no...

Page 106

...And perhaps he would not bear the
slightest resemblance to the ascetic saint, but would be...