On the Future of our Educational Institutions; Homer and Classical Philology Complete Works, Volume Three

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...(Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.





ON THE FUTURE OF OUR
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

HOMER AND CLASSICAL...

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...model literary and artistic
works which have come down to us from ancient Greece. To understand
these...

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... incessant action so as to hide himself from himself, etc.,

and then let him confess...

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...time." Without any qualms of conscience they
may improve the most fruitful and vigorous hours of...

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...ones, suffering in
yourselves from the corruption of the German spirit! Ye contemplative
ones who cannot, with...

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...of my task and the limited time at my disposal, to such
listeners, alone, in my...

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...and a refining
of the spirit of Germany that, as a result of this very process,...

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...in his "Epilogue to the Bell."

"Brighter now glow'd his cheek, and...

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...the ultimate victory of the two last-named movements, we
could find it in the fact that...

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...which is striving to educate and enlighten its members on
a scale so magnificently out of...

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...I independently
conceived the very same plan at the same hour and on the same spot,
and...

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...a glorious one; the weather was of the kind which, in our
climate at least, only...

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...associations. On a wooded slope alongside of our
shooting-range there was a small piece of ground...

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...are you the salt of the earth,
the intelligence of the future, the seed of our...

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...bitter tones:
"People should not have points of view, but thoughts!" And then his
companion added: "Be...

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...to our sentiments that in view of the
incomprehensible nature of our claims we must have...

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...and I raised our pistols: our shots
were echoed back to us, and with their echo...

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...the first
time a philosopher was about to stand in the way of his
philosophising.

The sage laughed....

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...We were
indeed undisturbed.

Some time elapsed in this way, and while the glow of sunset grew
steadily...

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...the philosopher's bench had lost its
original character and travelled to us in much more piercing...

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...forget yourself as to believe that you are one of the few? This
thought has occurred...

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...a tendency to _minimise and weaken_ it on the
other. The first-named would, for various reasons,...

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...the interests of gain; but that amount, at least, is
expected from them. In short: mankind...

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...circles people are in the habit of whispering to
one another words something after this style:...

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...speak. On the other hand, that adhesive and
tenacious stratum which has now filled up the...

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...with his distinguished tutor, and apologising for
having so far renounced his calling as a teacher...

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...short
in practice.

"Let any one examine the pedagogic literature of the present; he who
is not shocked...

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...up all hope in regard to every other scholastic question.
Therefore, dear master, enlighten me concerning...

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...it. If
you notice no physical loathing in yourselves when you meet with
certain words and tricks...

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...people deal with
it as if it were a dead language and as if the present...

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...these smiles German genius becomes
incensed and a worthier posterity will blush.

"The last department in which...

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...a whole world of reflection is spread out
before the astonished young man who, until then,...

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...thousands,
perhaps only _one_ is justified in describing himself as literary, and
that all others who at...

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...war-cry may come, it writes upon its shield--not overloaded
with honours--one of those confusing catchwords, such...

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...schools has been owing almost solely to the doubtful
æsthetic hobbies of a few teachers or...

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...learnt 'walking' in this
sense, and in our public schools, as our other writers show, no...

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...of
public schools. Philologists seem much more eagerly engaged in
introducing Homer and Sophocles to the young...

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...blind and assume the
position of seers notwithstanding? Which of you will ever attain to a
true...

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...was
established, which thenceforward was not to be merely a nursery for
science, but, above all, the...

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...the really artistic effect which the original, grown out of
the heart of Roman civilisation, is...

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...before a devouring yearning for
this genius of Greece takes possession of German genius, and not
before...

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...yet ripe for a higher culture, a culture
founded upon that of the ancients: the neglected...

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...the highest posts in the scholastic profession, as I
myself have done, then I know how...

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...establishments would suffice for their
further development, but that, in view of the present large numbers...

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...moment in which their limping or crawling or broken-winded
thoughts are at work shows us clearly...

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...genius to make his appearance; for him
to emerge from among the people; to portray the...

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...of the magnificent temples! A powerful
voice from every nook and cranny should ring in the...

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...written by Greek and Roman poets, and
are delighted with the proportions 7:13 = 14:26. Finally,...

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...a kind of insipidity and dullness is even looked
upon as decided talent, with the novelty...

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...philosopher, "but I suspect that, owing to
the way in which Latin and Greek are now...

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...life like that of the ants, even though
they are miles removed from true culture, if...

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...The public school is
here looked upon as an honourable aim, and every one who feels...

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...the germs of
his culture could not develop, but also that all his inimitable and
perennial culture...

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...that the many may in this way endeavour to escape the
rigid and strict discipline of...

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...to see what
we think we have gained from such a varied conversation.

"Remain in your present...

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...struggle for existence. The
question now is to what extent a man values his ego in...

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...servant and counsellor of one's practical
necessities, wants, and means of livelihood Every kind of training,
however,...

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...point
of view, instead of which we have shrewd and clever calculations, and,
so to speak, overreachings...

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...mind and matter, and to interpret 'realism' as 'the road
to knowledge, formation, and mastery of...

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...cliff, so it now seemed to us that we had hastened to meet the
great danger...

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...that it is he who is coming towards you with
all those lights."

And so much did...

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...am thinking of doing to-morrow, or what I have made up my
mind to do with...

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...burdened foundation up to the highest of the free and
unencumbered peaks there must be countless...

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...And would you give the name of
arguments to those distorted, clumsy, narrow-minded, ungainly,
crippled things? Yes,...

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...that Goethe speaks of in his
"Epilogue to the Bell"; towards each of them you acted...

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...which had served us as a
target. For a few minutes not a word more was...

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...wrong. How remote now seemed
the youthful dream of our educational institution; how clearly we saw
the...

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...file, and would be purged of everything which might tend
to make him strive after higher...

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...deciding factor here is the degree of
talent, or whether a man is accessible to these...

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...mere delusion. Continuously, with
every breath we take, some amount of that atmosphere circulates
through every vein...

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...he now apparently wanted to put an end to what appeared to
him to be a...

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...yet; but at any rate we must have a look at them from our
own side...

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...It was not
for our own sakes, not to show our tender feelings towards each other,
or...

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...its aim has been
proposed; and, if its aim happens to be wrong, all the others...

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...of some sort which they have snatched up with
youthful hands at the public school! The...

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...is the 'acroamatic' method
of teaching.

"The teacher, however, speaks to these listening students. Whatever
else he may...

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..._it_ demands, it gives
laws, it sits in judgment. Do not, then, let yourselves be deceived...

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...the formula for this self-destruction of
philosophy; and now, wherever the historical view of things is...

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...and Romans?--for we need now no longer pretend, like our
forefathers, to have any great regard...

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...and grow in him. He is afraid of
sinking at this early stage into the limits...

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...supporters and friends of that pseudo-culture of the present
time, which I so greatly detest, will...

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...midst of which the invigorating and uplifting breath of the true
German spirit would inspire them....

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...to
be little else than Schiller's robbers: their talk sounded so wild to
the anxious listener that...

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...imperative; now he was enraptured by
Weber's "Lyre and Sword" songs.[12] The gates of philosophy, of...

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...on the _homo sapiens_.

"Now, on the other hand, assume that your musical sense has returned,
and...

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...which, in his opinion, led to
intellectual lawlessness.--TR.

[10] Hegel's.--TR.

[11] A German students' association, of liberal principles,...

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...classical and everlasting standards. That these wholly different
scientific and æsthetico-ethical impulses have been associated under...

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...can protect us from the curse of ridiculous and barbaric
offences against good taste, or from...

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...want of piety and reverence must lie deeper; and many
are in doubt as to whether...

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...referred to is _the question of the personality of
Homer_.

We now meet everywhere with the firm...

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...of which the standpoint of those grammarians seemed to be
the last link, the last, indeed,...

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...seen to be below this standard and
opposed to this inner harmony is at once swept...

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...unites one to the other--it likewise
costs us some trouble to obtain a clear impression of...

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...party, on the other hand,
sheltered themselves beneath the authority of Aristotle, who especially
admired Homer's "divine"...

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...will of an individual man;[1] they now saw that
everything truly great in the kingdom of...

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...poet of
a literary period is still a popular poet in no narrower sense than the
popular...

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...scholar perceived with his
own artistic gifts, he now called Homer.

This is the central point of...

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...the _Iliad_, and further that
this individual was Homer. The first part of this contention may...

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...was infinitely inferior to the songs
that sprang up naturally in the poet's mind and were...

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...such delight in accusing us philologists of lack
of piety for great conceptions and an unproductive...

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...descended upon
the dull and tormented Boeotian peasants, so Philology comes into a
world full of gloomy...