On the Future of our Educational Institutions

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 85

|
| Page 124: neigbourhood replaced with neighbourhood |
| Page 130: universites replaced by universities |
| |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+

* * * * *

Last Page

Text Comparison with On the Future of our Educational Institutions; Homer and Classical Philology Complete Works, Volume Three

Page 6
No one should attempt to describe the future of our education, and the means and methods of instruction relating thereto, in a prophetic spirit, unless he can prove that the picture he draws already exists in germ to-day, and that all that is required is the extension and development of this embryo if the necessary modifications are to be produced in schools and other educational institutions.
Page 13
In that case, therefore, my lads, try to go through life in some other honourable manner; join the army or learn a handicraft that pays its way.
Page 21
Every one must be able to form some sort of estimate of himself; he must know how much he may reasonably expect from life.
Page 28
' "In accordance with the spirit of this address, the teacher of German at a public school would be forced to call his pupil's attention to thousands of details, and with the absolute certainty of good taste, to forbid their using such words and expressions, for instance, as: '_beanspruchen_,' '_vereinnahmen_,' '_einer Sache Rechnung tragen_,' '_die Initiative ergreifen_,' '_selbstverständlich_,'[3] etc.
Page 29
In the public school, the repulsive impress of our æsthetic journalism is stamped upon the still unformed minds of youths.
Page 32
"In regard to the language, what is surely least noticeable is any trace of the influence of _classical examples_: that is why, on the strength of this consideration alone, the so-called 'classical education' which is supposed to be provided by our public school, strikes me as something exceedingly doubtful and confused.
Page 48
Whoever is acquainted with our present public schools well knows what a wide gulf separates their teachers from classicism, and how, from a feeling of this want, comparative philology and allied professions have increased their numbers to such an unheard-of degree.
Page 49
The public schools are certainly the seats of this obesity, if, indeed, they have not degenerated into the abodes of that elegant barbarism which is boasted of as being 'German culture of the present!'" "But," asked the other, "what is to become of that large body of teachers who have not been endowed with a true gift for culture, and who set up as teachers merely to gain a livelihood from the profession, because there is a demand for them, because a superfluity of schools brings with it a superfluity of teachers? Where shall they go when antiquity peremptorily orders them to withdraw? Must they not be sacrificed to those powers of the present who, day after day, call out to them from the never-ending columns of the press 'We are culture! We are education! We are at the zenith! We are the apexes of the pyramids! We are the aims of universal history!'--when they hear the seductive promises, when the shameful signs of non-culture, the plebeian publicity of the so-called 'interests of culture' are extolled for their benefit in magazines and newspapers as an entirely new and the best possible, full-grown form of culture! Whither shall the poor fellows fly when they feel the presentiment that these promises are not true--where but to the most obtuse, sterile scientificality, that here the shriek of culture may no longer be audible to them? Pursued in this way, must they not end, like the ostrich, by burying their heads in the sand? Is it not a real happiness for them, buried as they are among dialects, etymologies, and conjectures, to lead a.
Page 53
In other words we have now come to a turning, and it would be advisable for us to take a short glance backwards.
Page 56
If you wish to guide a young man on the path of true culture, beware of interrupting his naive, confident, and, as it were, immediate and personal relationship with nature.
Page 60
"You astonish me, you will-o'-the-wisps," he said; "this is no quagmire we are on now.
Page 64
That is what I am talking about when I speak of lacking educational establishments, and why I think those which at present claim the name in such a pitiful condition.
Page 65
They arose perhaps from the instinctive anxiety to know whether, if the philosopher's views were carried into effect, our own personalities would find a place in the higher or lower division; and this made it necessary for us to find some arguments against the mode of thinking which robbed us of our self-styled claims to culture.
Page 70
It will be a midnight meeting indeed--but how am I to let him know that I am still here? Come! Your pistols; let us see your talent once again! Did you hear the severe rhythm of that melody saluting us? Mark it well, and answer it in the same rhythm by a series of shots.
Page 79
His condition is undignified, even dreadful: he keeps between the two extremes of work at high pressure and a state of melancholy enervation.
Page 83
[12] The gates of philosophy, of art, yea, even of antiquity, opened unto him; and in one of the most memorable of bloody acts, the murder of Kotzebue, he revenged--with penetrating insight and enthusiastic short-sightedness--his one and only Schiller, prematurely consumed by the opposition of the stupid world: Schiller, who could have been his leader, master, and organiser, and whose loss he now bewailed with such heartfelt resentment.
Page 85
" It must be freely admitted that philology is to some extent borrowed from several other sciences, and is mixed together like a magic potion from the most outlandish liquors, ores, and bones.
Page 89
We now meet everywhere with the firm opinion that the question of Homer's personality is no longer timely, and that it is quite a different thing from the real "Homeric question.
Page 96
This imaginary contest with Hesiod did not even yet show the faintest presentiment of individuality.
Page 99
such delight in accusing us philologists of lack of piety for great conceptions and an unproductive zeal for destruction.