On the Future of our Educational Institutions

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 1

| |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+

* * * * *




THE COMPLETE WORKS

OF

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

_The First Complete and Authorised English Translation_

EDITED BY

Dr. OSCAR LEVY

[Illustration]

VOLUME THREE

ON THE FUTURE OF OUR
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

* * * * *




_FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE_

ON THE FUTURE OF OUR
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS



TRANSLATED, WITH INTRODUCTION, BY
J.M. KENNEDY




T.N. FOULIS
13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET
EDINBURGH: and LONDON
1910




ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

_Printed by_ MORRISON & GIBB LIMITED, _Edinburgh_.




PREFACE.

(_To be read before the lectures, although it in no way relates to
them._)


The reader from whom I expect something must possess three qualities:
he must be calm and must read without haste; he must not be ever
interposing his own personality and his own special "culture"; and he
must not expect as the ultimate results of his study of these pages
that he will be presented with a set of new formulae. I do not propose
to furnish formulae or new plans of study for _Gymnasia_ or other
schools; and I am much more inclined to admire the extraordinary power
of those who are able to cover the whole distance between the depths
of empiricism and the heights of special culture-problems, and who
again descend to the level of the driest rules and the most neatly
expressed formulae. I shall be content if only I can ascend a tolerably
lofty mountain, from the summit of which, after having recovered my
breath, I may obtain a general survey of the ground; for I shall never
be able, in this book, to satisfy the votaries of tabulated rules.
Indeed, I see a time coming when serious

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Joyful Wisdom

Page 0
------------------------------------------------------------------------ THE COMPLETE WORKS OF FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE _The First Complete and Authorised English Translation_ EDITED BY DR OSCAR LEVY [Illustration] VOLUME TEN THE JOYFUL WISDOM ("LA GAYA SCIENZA") ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Of the First Edition of One Thousand Five Hundred Copies this is No.
Page 3
" Book fifth "We Fearless Ones," the Appendix "Songs of Prince Free-as-a-Bird," and the Preface, were added to the second edition in 1887.
Page 8
.
Page 13
'Twixt stone and grass I crawl once more, Hungry, by crooked ways, To eat the food I ate before, Earth-fare all serpents praise! 9.
Page 42
_Unconditional Duties.
Page 49
It is a question how a person is accustomed to _season_ his life; it is a matter of taste whether a person would rather have the slow or the sudden, the safe or the dangerous and daring increase of power,—he seeks this or that seasoning always according to his temperament.
Page 105
It is not music like that of Goethe's musician at the gate, which was pleasing also "in the hall," and to the king as well; it is not here said: "The knights looked on with martial air; with bashful eyes the ladies.
Page 124
132.
Page 129
believed that it _had_ this one and ultimate norm.
Page 151
_—What is originality? To _see_ something that does not yet bear a name, that cannot yet be named, although it is before everybody's eyes.
Page 156
to one another is the law to which we are _subject_: just by that shall we become more sacred to one another! Just by that shall the thought of our former friendship become holier! There is probably some immense, invisible curve and stellar orbit in which our courses and goals, so widely different, may be _comprehended_ as small stages of the way,—let us raise ourselves to this thought! But our life is too short, and our power of vision too limited for us to be more than friends in the sense of that sublime possibility.
Page 183
_otium_ and _bellum_ is there nobility and honour:" so rang the voice of ancient prejudice! 330.
Page 190
the closing up of old wounds, the repudiation of whole periods of the past—none of these things which may be connected with misfortune preoccupy the dear sympathiser.
Page 191
And although silent here about some things, I will not, however, be silent about my morality, which says to me: Live in concealment in order that thou _mayest_ live to thyself.
Page 194
----- Footnote 10: The distinction between ethos and pathos in Aristotle is, broadly, that between internal character and external circumstance.
Page 221
The first kind of cause is a quantum of stored-up force, which waits to be used in some manner, for some purpose; the second kind of cause, on the contrary, is something quite unimportant in comparison with the first, an insignificant hazard for the most part, in conformity with which the quantum of force in question "discharges" itself in some unique and definite manner: the lucifer-match in relation to the barrel of gunpowder.
Page 227
.
Page 241
" One must be _very light_ in order to impel one's will to knowledge to such a distance, and as it were beyond one's age, in order to create eyes for oneself for the survey of millenniums, and a pure heaven in these eyes besides! One must have freed oneself from many things by which we Europeans of to-day are oppressed, hindered, held down, and made heavy.
Page 256
Let them with fell curses shiver, Curl their lip the livelong day! Seek me as they will, forever Helplessly their eyes shall go astray! THE FOOL'S DILEMMA.
Page 259
.