On the Future of our Educational Institutions

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...generously made available by The Internet Archive)






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...men, working together in the
service of a completely rejuvenated and purified culture, may again
become the...

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...nature of
the problem under consideration.

The third and most important stipulation is, that he should in...

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...much
an inexperienced stranger among you, and much too superficially
acquainted with your methods, to pretend to...

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...surpassing them. Let it suffice that they are our institutions,
that they have not become a...

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...because it
has the strongest and mightiest of all allies in nature herself; and
in this respect...

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...over our educational institutions, although these were
based originally upon very different principles. These forces are:...

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...on this subject between two remarkable men,
and the more striking points of the discussion, together...

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...dream
framed, as it were, by two periods of growth. We two remained quiet
and peaceful, although...

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...but owing to
the very fact that we had many sins of omission on our conscience
during...

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...and breathless stillness of
nature. The shadows were already lengthening, the sun still shone
steadily, though it...

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...to the lofty trees at our feet, we were unable
to catch a glimpse of the...

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...the first place, you are mistaken concerning the main point; for
we are not here to...

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...we had
actually selected this peaceful spot, with its few benches in the
midst of the wood,...

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...solemnisation, all reminiscence
and all future; the present was to be as a hyphen between the...

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...frighten you."

The philosopher was silent; his companion, however, said: "Our
promises and plans unfortunately compel us...

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...your pistol-shots. Try to imitate the
Pythagoreans to-day: they, as servants of a true philosophy, had...

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...out, I think,
that in the eyes of the present age, which is so intolerant of
anything...

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...which I went to such
pains to inculcate upon you during our former intimacy. Tell me,--what
was...

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...nothing from you, sir," the companion replied. "I have
heard too much from your lips at...

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...so
that his particular degree of knowledge and science may yield him the
greatest possible amount of...

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...of everything which tends to extend
culture, provided that it be of service to its officials...

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...one spoke of cultured men; but experience tells us
that it would be difficult to find...

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...evasive Hellenic world and to the real home of culture,
when in less than an hour,...

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...time is over; its days are counted. The first
who will dare to be quite straightforward...

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...me. We are both acquainted
with public schools; do you think, for instance, that in respect...

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...badly as it is just possible to do so in
an age of newspaper German: that...

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...is intended to deal only with the
acquisition of facts, _e.g._ history, mathematics, etc.], and one...

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...study of the language,
what is there besides which the German teacher is wont to offer?...

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...us only think of what takes place at such an age in the
production of such...

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...be the
suppression of all ridiculous claims to independent judgment, and the
inculcation upon young men of...

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...confused. For how
could anybody, after having cast one glance at those examples, fail to
see the...

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...training in languages.
'Formal education,' however, which is supposed to be achieved by this
method of teaching...

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...compelled to learn
walking after having walked almost all his life as a dilettante or
empiricist. It...

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...can have but one natural
starting-point--an artistic, earnest, and exact familiarity with the
use of the mother-tongue:...

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...For the public school boy of to-day,
the Hellenes as Hellenes are dead: yes, he gets...

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...that belongs to his native
soil. The splendid practice afforded by translating from one language
into another,...

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...of ruins; one
must love it so that one is not ashamed of it in its...

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...courage and severity of German philosophy and in the loyalty
of the German soldier, which has...

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...long and solemn pause. Both the philosopher and his
companion sat silent, sunk in deep dejection:...

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...and said: "You used to hold out hopes to me, but now you
have done more:...

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...such a teacher originates, how he
_becomes_ a teacher of such high status. Such a large...

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...one
which we, my good friend, have often met with: those blatant heralds
of educational needs, when...

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...what the aspiration is of those who would disturb
the healthy slumber of the people, and...

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...has convinced himself of the
singularity and inaccessibility of Hellenic antiquity, and has warded
off this conviction...

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...and
orgiastic sides of antiquity: he makes up his mind once and for all to
let the...

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...That, however, may be tolerated, for every being must perish
by some means or other; but...

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...our present
public schools well knows what a wide gulf separates their teachers
from classicism, and how,...

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...they
go when antiquity peremptorily orders them to withdraw? Must they not
be sacrificed to those powers...

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...being made in this quarter to raise the
public school, formally systematised, up to the so-called...

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...popular conscription.
Where everyone proudly wears his soldier's uniform at regular
intervals, where almost every one has...

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...never comes into contact with this true
German spirit: with that spirit which speaks to us...

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...be surprised if, without further
parley, the State falls upon his neck and cries aloud in...

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...overladen and gaily-decked
caravan of culture is pulled up short, horror-stricken. We must not
only astonish, but...

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...he never succeeds in
freeing himself from his own hankering and restless personality: that
illuminated, ethereal sphere...

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...relationship with nature. The
woods, the rocks, the winds, the vulture, the flowers, the butterfly,
the meads,...

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...culture! To say
the least, the secondary schools cannot be reproached with this; for
they have up...

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... *

I must now, ladies and gentlemen, convey to you the impressions
experienced by my...

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...rate so far as they could be cleared up in
the darkness of the wood. "Oh,...

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...chorus, and truly 'idealistic spectators'--for
they did not disturb us; we thought we were alone with...

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...around me or lies heavily on my
breast: it is like a shirt of mail that...

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...obtain the education you demand for
them, to what degree do they show that they have...

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...your impressions when you
think of Winckelmann, who, that he might rid his eyes of your
grotesque...

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...it by praising me, deserves the answer that
the present system is a scandal and a...

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...all the
objections we had made, and how greatly the echo of _the_ present was
heard in...

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...And when the leader gives the word it will be re-echoed
from rank to rank. For...

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...out their life's task. But now it is just these talents I
speak of which are...

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...have any difficulty with the resisting
and unwilling horse that Plato has also described to us,...

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...men are wont, to be, something that you young men nowadays look
upon as old-fashioned. But...

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...cried
"False time!" as our rhythm was suddenly interrupted: for, like a
lightning flash, a shooting star...

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...from Bonn--students--can my friend have come here with
_students_?"

This question, uttered almost wrathfully, provoked us. "What's...

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...have
known you, I have learnt that the most noteworthy, instructive, and
decisive experiences and events in...

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...even seems to
me," I said, "that everything for which you have justly blamed the
public school...

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...yours by the
standard of this culture, and to consider your university as an
educational institution and...

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...is left to the
independent decision of the liberal-minded and unprejudiced student,
and since, again, he can...

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...gleam, both as the exemplification of a triviality and, at the
same time, of an eternally...

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...from the standpoint of culture is answered.

"In what relationship these universities stand to _art_ cannot...

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...perceived him he is the dumb but terrible
accuser of those who are to blame.

"You should...

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...that other crowd of
indifferent natures does not count at all, natures that delight in
their freedom...

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...in the journalistic corruption of the people, how else than
by the acknowledgment that their learning...

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...to the
old, primitive _Burschenschaft_.[11]

"When the war of liberation was over, the young student brought back
home...

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...the
German university then understand that spirit, as even the German
princes in their hatred appear to...

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...the followers when they are seeking their
predestined leader, and overcomes them by the fumes of...

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...down by Nietzsche in the spring
and autumn of 1872, and...

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