Human, All-Too-Human: A Book for Free Spirits, Part 1 Complete Works, Volume Six

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 61

necessity--so says the
new knowledge, and this knowledge itself is necessity. Everything is
innocence, and knowledge is the road to insight into this innocence.
Are pleasure, egoism, vanity _necessary_ for the production of the
moral phenomena and their highest result, the sense for truth and
justice in knowledge; were error and the confusion of the imagination
the only means through which mankind could raise itself gradually to
this degree of self-enlightenment and self-liberation--who would dare
to undervalue these means? Who would dare to be sad if he perceived the
goal to which those roads led? Everything in the domain of morality
has evolved, is changeable, unstable, everything is dissolved, it is
true; but _everything is also streaming towards one goal._ Even if
the inherited habit of erroneous valuation, love and hatred, continue
to reign in us, yet under the influence of growing knowledge it will
become weaker; a new habit, that of comprehension, of not loving, not
hating, of overlooking, is gradually implanting itself in us upon the
same ground, and in thousands of years will perhaps be powerful enough
to give humanity the strength to produce wise, innocent (consciously
innocent) men, as it now produces unwise, guilt-conscious men,--_that
is the necessary preliminary step, not its opposite._


[Footnote 1: Dr. Paul Rée.--J.M.K.]

[Footnote 2: Dr. Paul Rée.--J.M.K.]

[Footnote 3: This is the untranslatable word _Schadenfreude,_ which
means joy at the misfortune of others.--J.M.K.]




THIRD DIVISION.


THE RELIGIOUS LIFE.



108.

THE DOUBLE FIGHT AGAINST EVIL.--When misfortune overtakes us we can
either pass over I it so lightly that its cause is removed, or so
that the result which it has on our temperament is altered, through a
changing, therefore, of the evil into a good, the utility of which is
perhaps not visible until later on. Religion and art (also metaphysical
philosophy) work upon the changing of the temperament, partly through
the changing of our judgment on events (for instance, with the help
of the phrase "whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth"), partly through
the awakening of a pleasure in pain, in emotion generally (whence
the tragic art takes its starting-point). The more a man is inclined
to twist and arrange meanings the less he will grasp the causes of
evil and disperse them; the momentary mitigation and influence of
a narcotic, as for example in toothache, suffices him even in more
serious sufferings. The more the dominion of creeds and all arts
dispense with narcotics, the more strictly men attend to the actual
removing of the evil, which is certainly bad for writers of tragedy;
for the material for tragedy is growing scarcer because the domain of
pitiless, inexorable fate is growing ever narrower,--but

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Text Comparison with The Twilight of the Idols - The Antichrist Complete Works, Volume Sixteen

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FOULIS 13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET EDINBURGH: AND LONDON 1911 CONTENTS TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE PREFACE MAXIMS AND MISSILES THE PROBLEM OF SOCRATES "REASON" IN PHILOSOPHY HOW THE "TRUE WORLD" ULTIMATELY BECAME A FABLE MORALITY AS THE ENEMY OF NATURE THE FOUR GREAT ERRORS THE "IMPROVERS" OF MANKIND THINGS THE GERMANS LACK SKIRMISHES IN A WAR WITH THE ACT THINGS I OWE TO THE ANCIENTS THE ANTICHRIST ETERNAL RECURRENCE NOTES TO ZARATHUSTRA TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE _The Twilight of the Idols_ was written towards the end of the summer of 1888, its composition seems to have occupied only a few days,--so few indeed that, in _Ecce Homo_ (p.
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Socrates wished to die.
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For the condemnation of life by a living creature is after all but the symptom of a definite kind of life: the question as to whether the condemnation is justified or the reverse is not even raised.
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And even your atom, my dear good Mechanists and Physicists, what an amount of error, of rudimentary psychology still adheres to it!--Not to speak of the "thing-in-itself," of the _horrendum pudendum_ of the metaphysicians! The error of spirit regarded as a cause, confounded with reality! And made the measure of reality! And called _God!_ 4 _The Error of imaginary Causes.
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That is how they do penance in that country.
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Be all this as it may, he is certainly the most _interesting!_ As regards animals, Descartes was the first, with really admirable daring, to venture the thought that the beast was _machina,_ and the whole of our physiology is endeavouring to prove this proposition.
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24 Here I only touch upon the problem of the origin of Christianity.
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This brought him to the cross: the proof of this is the inscription found thereon.
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31 I have given my reply to the problem in advance.
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" (Mark ix.
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the principal questions, all the principal problems of value, stand beyond human reason.
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If it were in any way capable of a stationary or stable condition, and if in the whole course of its existence only one second of Being, in the strict sense of the word, had been possible, then there could no longer be such a process as evolution, and therefore no thinking and no observing of such a process.
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He who does not believe in it has but a fleeting life in his consciousness.
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In order to be able to create we must allow ourselves greater freedom than has ever been vouch-safed us before; to this end we must be emancipated from morality, and we must be relieved by means of feasts (Premonitions of the future! We must celebrate the future and no longer the past! We must compose the myth poetry of the future! We must live in hopes!) Blessed moments I And then we must once again pull down the curtain and turn our thoughts to the next unswerving purpose.