Human, All-Too-Human: A Book for Free Spirits, Part 1 Complete Works, Volume Six

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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HUMAN

ALL-TOO-HUMAN

_A BOOK FOR FREE SPIRITS_

PART I

By

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE


TRANSLATED BY

HELEN ZIMMERN

WITH INTRODUCTION BY

J. M. KENNEDY


The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche

The First Complete and Authorised English Translation

Edited by Dr Oscar Levy

Volume Six

T.N. FOULIS

13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET

EDINBURGH: AND LONDON

1909




CONTENTS.


INTRODUCTION

AUTHOR'S PREFACE

FIRST DIVISION: FIRST AND LAST THINGS
SECOND DIVISION: THE HISTORY OF THE MORAL
SENTIMENT
THIRD DIVISION: THE RELIGIOUS LIFE
FOURTH DIVISION: CONCERNING THE SOUL OF
ARTISTS AND AUTHORS
FIFTH DIVISION: THE SIGNS OF HIGHER AND
LOWER CULTURE
SIXTH DIVISION: MAN IN SOCIETY
SEVENTH DIVISION: WIFE AND CHILD
EIGHTH DIVISION: A GLANCE AT THE STATE
AN EPODE--AMONG FRIENDS




INTRODUCTION.


Nietzsche's essay, _Richard Wagner in Bayreuth,_ appeared in 1876,
and his next publication was his present work, which was issued in
1878. A comparison of the books will show that the two years of
meditation intervening had brought about a great change in Nietzsche's
views, his style of expressing them, and the form in which they
were cast. The Dionysian, overflowing with life, gives way to an
Apollonian thinker with a touch of pessimism. The long essay form is
abandoned, and instead we have a series of aphorisms, some tinged with
melancholy, others with satire, several, especially towards the end,
with Nietzschian wit at its best, and a few at the beginning so very
abstruse as to require careful study.

Since the Bayreuth festivals of 1876, Nietzsche had gradually come to
see Wagner as he really was. The ideal musician that Nietzsche had
pictured in his own mind turned out to be nothing more than a rather
dilettante philosopher, an opportunistic decadent with a suspicious
tendency towards Christianity. The young philosopher thereupon
proceeded to shake off the influence which the musician had exercised
upon him. He was successful in doing so, but not without a struggle,
just as he had formerly shaken off the influence of Schopenhauer.
Hence he writes in his autobiography:[1] "_Human, all-too-Human,_ is
the monument of a crisis. It is entitled: 'A book for _free_ spirits,'
and almost every line in it represents a victory--in its pages I freed
myself from everything foreign to my real nature. Idealism is foreign
to me: the title says, 'Where _you_ see ideal things,

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Text Comparison with The Will to Power, Book III and IV An Attempted Transvaluation of all Values

Page 8
473.
Page 11
.
Page 12
481.
Page 18
Thus it is necessary that something should be assumed to be true, _not_ that it _is_ true.
Page 31
_ For a world of truth and Being to be simulated, the truthful one would first have to be created (it being understood that he must believe himself to be "truthful").
Page 35
_To combat determinism and teleology.
Page 39
" If one imagines other "things" to be non-existent, a thing has no qualities.
Page 93
For in regard to all utility and harmfulness there are a hundred different ways of asking "what for?" I despise this pessimism of sensitiveness: it is in itself a sign of profoundly impoverished life.
Page 97
.
Page 111
Utility and pleasure are slave theories of life.
Page 120
782.
Page 126
"[8]) [Footnote 8: "Berliner"--The citizens of Berlin are renowned in Germany for their poor jokes.
Page 127
] 799.
Page 133
.
Page 150
_--Nature is cruel in her cheerfulness; cynical in her sunrises.
Page 174
Such a person does not know himself; he walks through life without ever having learned to walk.
Page 188
The aspect of the European of to-day makes me very hopeful.
Page 208
been effectively attained.
Page 218
The tragic man says yea even to the.
Page 221
1063.