Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...HUMAN, ALL TOO HUMAN

A BOOK FOR FREE SPIRITS

...

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...in friendship, a blindness, free from
suspicion and questioning, to two sidedness; a pleasure in externals,
superficialities,...

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...that a soul in which the type of "free spirit" can
attain maturity and completeness had...

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...he overturns whatever he
finds veiled or protected by any reverential awe: he would see what
these...

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...One lives--no longer in the bonds of love and
hate, without a yes or no, here...

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...great liberation, a
riddle which has hitherto lingered, obscure, well worth questioning,
almost impalpable, in his memory....

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...down the law to our to-day. Granted, that it
is the problem of classification[2] of which...

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...THE FIRST AND LAST THINGS.


1

=Chemistry of the Notions and the Feelings.=--Philosophical problems, in
almost all their...

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...as fashioned through the influence of certain
religious and even of certain political developments, as the...

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...mind was not brought into play through the medium of exact thought.
Its serious business lay...

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...very conspicuously forward, so that every philosophy
has, unconsciously, the air of ascribing the highest utility...

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...a purely abstract
scientific problem and one not much calculated to give men uneasiness:
yet everything that...

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...that in language he possessed a knowledge of the
cosmos. The language builder was not so...

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...sleep and in dream we
make the pilgrimage of early mankind over again.


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=Logic of the Dream.=--During...

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...and served as such. (Savages show the
same tendency in operation, as the reports of travelers...

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...lifetime is
spent in the super-inducing conditions.--Even the poet, the artist,
ascribes to his sentimental and emotional...

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...deduced cause and from cause is deduced the
unconditioned. This process is generally looked upon as...

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...to
us as the accumulated treasure of all the past--as the _treasure_, for
whatever is worth anything...

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...of pleasure or pain in relation
to the apprehending subject. A third feeling, as the result...

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...we feign realities, unities, that have no
existence. Our feelings, notions, of space and time are...

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...as yet very few who go a few steps
backward: one should look out over the...

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...results? In actual fact, science requires
doubt and distrust as her surest auxiliaries; nevertheless, the sum...

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...of Progress.=--When a master of the old civilization (den
alten Cultur) vows to hold no more...

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...should regulate their
conduct with reference to special, and even, in certain circumstances,
evil, objects. At any...

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...religion by way of science entails a powerful, perilous
leap,--something that should be advised against. With...

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...thinks, the more exquisitely he
feels, the higher the standard he sets for himself, the greater...

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...from the illogical springs much that is good. The
illogical is so imbedded in the passions,...

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...in view, but isolated
portions of it. If one is capable of fixing his observation upon
exceptional...

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...know how to console themselves.


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=For Tranquility.=--But will not our philosophy become thus a tragedy?
Will not...

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...disagreeable characteristics of old dogs and old men that have
been a long time chained up....

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...him: for the subtlest mind cannot
adequately appreciate the art of maxim-making unless it has had...

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...implant in the soul
a taste for belittling and impeaching mankind.


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=Nevertheless.=--The matter therefore, as regards pro...

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...This
dictum, grown hard and cutting beneath the hammer-blow of historical
knowledge, can some day, perhaps, in...

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...origin
of these designations is forgotten [but] it is imagined that action in
itself, without reference to...

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...will (Wollen) must precede his
existence.--Here, apart from the absurdity of the statement just made,
there is...

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...status. A lower enjoyment (for example,
sensual pleasure) preferred to a more highly esteemed one (for...

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...is powerless and
cannot requite is called bad. A man belongs, as a good individual, to
the...

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...a greater extent than ourselves, nevertheless, the
unegoistic--this word is not to be taken too strictly,...

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...the masses who stand in need of the promptings of the
emotions (since they are not...

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...raking them with the small shot of
wickedness? The majority are too ignoble and a few...

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...and openly is against us, therefore he speaks
the truth. Hence the child has faith in...

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...from
him: no difference in goodness or badness. But things we cannot
accomplish ourselves, we are apt...

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...highest end is attained. The mother gives her child what
she deprives herself of--sleep, the best...

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...may entail).
Both views are short sighted.


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=Ability to Wait.=--Ability to wait is so hard to acquire...

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...their servitors is a remnant of
the caste distinction between man and man; a specimen of...

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...spoken of the former as if it
were a far higher entity than the latter? Is...

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...He does not know the
full extent of his own susceptibility. Wretched environment makes him
wretched. It...

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...would be without vanity! As
it is, it resembles a well stacked and ever renewed ware-emporium...

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...mean to
justify continued sentiments of compunction in the ruler of the world.
Indeed no cruel man...

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...relying more
upon the judgment of their fellow men than upon their own.--Interest in
oneself, the wish...

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...object of self sacrifice,
while the merit of the pain and emulation thus expended is, by...

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...acts as a collective individuality.


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=Ethic of the Developed Individual.=--Hitherto the altruistic has been
looked upon as...

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...understood) is looked upon,
through all the variations of moral laws, in different ages, as the
peculiarly...

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...anxiety is felt that
everything be done in due routine. Even when a custom is exceedingly
burdensome...

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...which most disturb us at
present do so because of the erroneous supposition that the one...

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...forth, as a
mystery to the subjects, impregnated with secrecy and shame, sentiments
still quite operative among...

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...be learned and it can never be wholly
learned.


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"=Man Always Does Right.="--We do not blame nature...

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...others in order to feel pleasure oneself?
Simply from the standpoint of utility, that is, in...

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...imagination, feel
pain also. But what a difference there always is between the tooth ache
and the...

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...waves we behold freedom
of the will and of the impulses. But everything is compulsory,
everything can...

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...he must: be it in deeds of vanity,
revenge, pleasure, utility, badness, cunning, be it in...

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...and in the same soil, and may, perhaps, in
thousands of years be powerful enough to...

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...state of things arises the danger
that, through the perception of truth or, more accurately, seeing
through...

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...So that between the most ancient wisdom
of man and all later wisdom there prevails harmony,...

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...exists between religion and true science neither
relationship nor friendship, not even enmity: they dwell in...

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...shoots off a bow, there is always an
irrational strength and agency in the act. If...

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...rule and tradition
as you are yourself?--The cogitation of the superstitious and
magic-deluded man is upon the...

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...his portrait, a direct influence (by refraining from
devout offerings, by whippings, chainings and the like)...

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...the religious feeling. The feeling that this
mixture is possible is becoming extinct. We realize the...

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...feeling of utter abasement it suddenly
flashed the gleam of divine compassion, so that the amazed...

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...its first disciples.


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=Fate of Christianity.=--Christianity arose to lighten the heart, but
now it must first make...

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...superstition--he dealt with
as freely as the Sculptor with his clay, therefore with the same freedom
that...

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...became extinct? But the results of all these things are
nevertheless not thrown away: the inner...

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...too, free from mythology: hence one purely psychological.
Heretofore psychological explanations of religious conditions and
processes have...

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...is betrayed into this condition not through his
"fault" and "sin" but through a series of...

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...accepted but as to how it originated can no longer, in
the present state of comparative...

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...God. As formerly in his states of discouragement he
interpreted his conduct falsely so now he...

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...do
many thinkers bring themselves to views which are far from likely to
increase or improve their...

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...A god who sacrifices himself would be the most
powerful and most effective symbol of this...

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...means
whereby such natures may resist the general exhaustion of their will to
live (their nerves). They...

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...from being the general human opinion. It is
not even the opinion of all pessimists. Empedocles,...

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...called
need of salvation, which is the result not of a real but of an imaginary
sinfulness....

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...admiration and even
of prayer--at least in more simple times. Very soon the saint turns upon
himself...

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...he stood for
something that was far above the human standard in wisdom and goodness.
Faith in...