Homer and Classical Philology

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...[Transcriber's Note:

This lecture was taken from Volume III of _The Complete Works of
Friedrich Nietzsche_, Dr....

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...the estimation of philology in public opinion
depends upon the weight of the personalities of the...

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...of
classical philology derived from this theory. We may consider antiquity
from a scientific point of view;...

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...I cannot help thinking, however, that some of
these scruples are still sounding in the ears...

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...of Homeric criticism, take his stand upon the question of
personality as being the really fruitful...

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...poem and its tradition was prepared,
according to which these discrepancies were not due to Homer,...

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...we go still further backwards from Aristotle, the
inability to create a personality is seen to...

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...to have become active; the happiest people,
in the happiest period of its existence, in the...

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...hand, wavered between the supposition of
one genius plus a number of minor poets, and another...

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...genius set upon their empty heads. It was imagined
that new shells were forming round a...

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...the Homeric poems.

Since literary history first ceased to be a mere collection of names,
people have...

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...tells of the contest between Homer and Hesiod,
which proves that when these two names were...

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...he usually
piles conception on conception, and endeavours to adjust his characters
according to a comprehensive scheme.

He...

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...parallel, and, further, one which proves to be of
incalculable difficulty?

Let it be noted that the...

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...this statement was,
unfortunately, not justified.--TR.

And there is a second fact which I should like to...

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...great homogeneous views alone remain. Now,
therefore, that I have enunciated my philological creed, I trust...