Ecce Homo Complete Works, Volume Seventeen

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 81

slightest hints I gather that they do not even know
what lies hidden in my books. And with regard even to my _Zarathustra,_
which of my friends would have seen more in it than a piece of
unwarrantable, though fortunately harmless, arrogance? Ten years have
elapsed, and no one has yet felt it a duty to his conscience to defend
my name against the absurd silence beneath which it has been entombed.
It was a foreigner, a Dane, who first showed sufficient keenness of
instinct and of courage to do this, and who protested indignantly
against my so-called friends. At what German University to-day would
such lectures on my philosophy be possible, as those which Dr. Brandes
delivered last spring in Copenhagen, thus proving once more his right
to the title psychologist? For my part, these things have never caused
me any pain; that which is _necessary_ does not offend me. _Amor fati_
is the core of my nature. This, however, does not alter the fact that
I love irony and even world-historic irony. And thus, about two years
before hurling the destructive thunderbolt of the _Transvaluation,_
which will send the whole of civilisation into convulsions, I sent
my _Case of Wagner_ out into the world. The Germans were given the
chance of blundering and immortalising their stupidity once more on my
account, and they still have just enough time to do it in. And have
they fallen in with my plans? Admirably! my dear Germans. Allow me to
congratulate you.



[Footnote 1: The motto of _The Case of Wagner._--TR.]

[Footnote 2: An opera by Nessler which was all the rage in Germany
twenty years ago.--TR.]

[Footnote 3: Unfortunately it is impossible to render this play on the
words in English.--TR.]

[Footnote 4: The German National Song (_Deutschland, Deutschland über
alles_).--TR.]

[Footnote 5: Ever since the year 1617 such plays have been produced by
the Protestants of Germany.--TR.]

[Footnote 6: _Schleiermacher_ literally means a weaver or maker of
veils.--TR.]




WHY I AM A FATALITY



1


I know my destiny. There will come a day $ when my name will recall
the memory of something formidable--a crisis the like of which has
never been known on earth, the memory of the most profound clash
of consciences, and the passing of a sentence upon all that which
theretofore had been believed, exacted, and hallowed. I am not a
man, I am dynamite. And with it all there is nought of the founder
of a religion in me. Religions are matters for the mob; after coming
in contact with a religious man, I always feel that I must wash my
hands.... I require no "believers," it

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Text Comparison with On the Future of our Educational Institutions; Homer and Classical Philology Complete Works, Volume Three

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FOULIS 13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET EDINBURGH: AND LONDON 1909 CONTENTS TRANSLATOR'S INTRODUCTION AUTHOR'S PREFACE AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF OUR EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS FIRST LECTURE SECOND LECTURE THIRD LECTURE FOURTH LECTURE FIFTH LECTURE HOMER AND CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY TRANSLATOR'S INTRODUCTION "On the Future of our Educational Institutions" comprehends a series of five lectures delivered by Nietzsche when Professor of Classical Philology at Băle University.
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time.
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The day was.
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Away with these pistols and compose yourselves.
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That was our last shot, and it was intended for our friends on the Rhine.
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the first time a philosopher was about to stand in the way of his philosophising.
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Who, having seen all these effects at _one_ glance, could any longer doubt whether all the faults of our public, literary, and artistic life were not stamped upon every fresh generation by the system we are examining: hasty and vain production, the disgraceful manufacture of books; complete want of style; the crude, characterless, or sadly swaggering method of expression; the loss of every æsthetic canon; the voluptuousness of anarchy and chaos--in short, the literary peculiarities of both our journalism and our scholarship.
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The splendid practice afforded by translating from one language into another, which so improves and fertilises one's artistic feeling for one's own tongue, is, in the case of German, never conducted with that fitting categorical strictness and dignity which would be above all necessary in dealing with an undisciplined language.
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At the most, owing to their scholarly mannerisms and display of knowledge, he will be reminded of the fact that in Latin countries it is the artistically-trained man, and that in Germany it is the abortive scholar, who becomes a journalist.
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e.
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Our objections, however, were not purely intellectual ones: our reasons for protesting against the philosopher's statements seemed to lie elsewhere.
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We may also be allowed to remind you that you, at an earlier stage of your remarks, gave me the promise that you would do so.
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As a rule he wishes to have as many hearers as possible; he is not content to have a few, and he is never satisfied with one only.
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The most trivial bustle fastens itself upon him; he sinks under his heavy burden.
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The consternation raised by these young men was indeed far more general than had ever been caused by those other 'robbers' in court circles, of which a German prince, according to Goethe, is said to have expressed the opinion: 'If he had been God, and had foreseen the appearance of the _Robbers_, he would not have created the world.
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If we go still further backwards from Aristotle, the inability to create a personality is seen to increase; more and more poems are attributed to Homer; and every period lets us see its degree of criticism by how much and what it considers as Homeric.
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"For who would wage war with the gods: who, even with the one god?" asks Goethe even, who, though a genius, strove in vain to solve that mysterious problem of the Homeric inaccessibility.
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poet of a literary period is still a popular poet in no narrower sense than the popular poet of an illiterate age.
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So Homer, the poet of the _Iliad_ and the _Odyssey_, is an æsthetic judgment.
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It is certainly the standard of an artist's greatness to note what he can take in with a single glance and set out in rhythmical form.