Ecce Homo Complete Works, Volume Seventeen

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...(Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)





ECCE HOMO

(_NIETZSCHES AUTOBIOGRAPHY_)

BY

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE


TRANSLATED BY

ANTHONY M. LUDOVICI


POETRY RENDERED...

Page 1

...battlefield of thought, on
which there is no quarter, and for which no Geneva Convention has...

Page 2

...shoulder, without
hesitation, without fear of consequences, and, above all, without
concealment. Only in one place does...

Page 3

...the gentleness with which, in Chapter II., Wagner--the
supposed mortal enemy, the supposed envied rival to...

Page 4

...healthy human being,
suffered the experience of seeing even his oldest friends, including
Rhode, show the most...

Page 5

...he endured such long years
of solitude, which to him, the sensitive artist to whom friends...

Page 6

...expressing this contrast in a cheerful and at the same
time sympathetic manner--maybe this is the...

Page 7

...it, I gave
my fellow-men the greatest gift that has ever been bestowed upon them.
This book,...

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...break down?
Take heed, lest a statue crush you.

"Ye say ye believe in Zarathustra? But of;...

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...the summer like a shadow in St. Moritz, and spent the following
winter, the most sunless...

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...the organs
of observation. To look upon healthier concepts and values from the
standpoint of the sick,...

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...one integral
block, which is hard, sweet, and fragrant as well. He enjoys that only
which is...

Page 12

...to the
post of General Superintendent at Weimar after Herder's death. It is
not unlikely that her...

Page 13

...trace of some one's
having shown me ill-will. You might perhaps discover, however, too
many traces of...

Page 14

...is called a virtue. What I reproach the
pitiful with is, that they are too ready...

Page 15

...All silent people
are dyspeptic. You perceive that I should not like to see rudeness
undervalued; it...

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...of detrimental secretions, as, for instance, that
of bile into the stomach. To the sick man...

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...Such natures need
resistance, consequently they go in search of obstacles: the pathos of
aggression belongs of...

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...always
been kindly disposed to me. I, personally, the most essential opponent
of Christianity, am far from...

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...it, my brethren! Up here, on the loftiest height, the
spring of joyfulness gusheth forth for...

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...I AM SO CLEVER



1


Why do I know more things than other people? Why, in fact,...

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...so backward that my ignorance was almost
saintly. This "culture," which from first to last teaches...

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...is an absurdity. Strange to say, whereas
small quantities of alcohol, taken with plenty of water,...

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...in the open, to
the accompaniment of free bodily motion--nor in one in which even the
muscles...

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...a very
delicate and reliable instrument, and that I am able to calculate the
change in degrees...

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...the limits of that which he can allow himself--in other
words, the limits of that which...

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...in their
origin. The most striking example of this was Madame Cosima Wagner,
by far the most...

Page 27

...possessed that divine wickedness, without which
perfection itself becomes unthinkable to me,--I estimate the value of
men,...

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...deeds, with crime--_it actually presupposes the
latter._ ... We do not know half enough about Lord...

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...is the Parisian earnestness _par excellence._
In Germany no one has any idea of the tremendous...

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...it is even imperative, to employ a
mystic formula for this purpose. I suppose I know...

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...rolled
Over the glittering rim away.
Music, gondolas, lights--
Drunk, swam far forth in the gloom....

A stringed instrument,...

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...a
mere reacting medium. As an example of this I point to the intercourse
with books. The...

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...here they are concerned in subserving selfishness
and self-discipline. The whole surface of consciousness--for
consciousness _is_ a...

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...I was scarcely four-and-twenty
years of age. In the same way, two years previously, I had...

Page 35

...of
fanaticism in my nature. No one can point to any moment of my life
in which...

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...University of Leipzig for an essay,
_De fontibus Diogenis Laertii._ He was successful in gaining the...

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...of
my _Zarathustra,_ I said to him that this was just as it should be: to
have...

Page 38

...people will believe that where nothing
is heard there is nothing to hear.... This, at least,...

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...everywhere: I have not yet been discovered
in Europe's flatland--Germany.... And, to make a confession, I...

Page 40

...down from heights into which no bird has ever soared; I
know abysses into which no...

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...reveal
his riddle?

"Unto you, daring explorers and experimenters, and unto all who have
ever embarked beneath cunning...

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...not his peer, is perhaps the first conclusion
at which a good reader will arrive--a reader...

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...its foundation, it is the
mortal hatred of the sexes. Have you heard my reply to...

Page 44

...more
enthusiastically and whole-heartedly.... The genius of the heart,
which makes all loud and self-conceited things hold...

Page 45

...quite strange to its age: no one
would dream that it was begun in the thunder...

Page 46

...philosophy, and in some respects too
even Plato's philosophy--in short, the whole of idealism in its...

Page 47

...time no such thing existed as this translation
of the Dionysian phenomenon into philosophic emotion: tragic...

Page 48

...the
representation of the already existing author of _Zarathustra,_ and
it is drawn with an abysmal depth...

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...dreamer, that I delight
in drawing the sword--and perhaps, also, that my wrist is dangerously
supple. The...

Page 50

...it cost me
some pains to prevent my indignant friends in Bâle from taking action
against it....

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...dock." ... The after-effects
of this essay of mine proved invaluable to me in my life....

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...183 of _Schopenhauer as Educator._ Plato made use
of Socrates in the same way--that is to...

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...into the domain of the menu, where their efforts at
rendering the meaning of French dishes...

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...a
feeling of profound strangeness towards everything that surrounded
me there, is one of its first conditions....

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...sentence or two down
in my note-book, nothing but severe psychological stuff, which it is
possible may...

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...or following on my part, and any further misunderstanding
of myself. Every kind of life, the...

Page 57

...in bandages, and extremely painful,
I dictated while he wrote and corrected as he went along--to...

Page 58

...the root of the
'metaphysical need' of man,--whether more as a blessing than a curse to
the...

Page 59

...of this book. Where does its author seek that
new morning, that delicate red, as yet...

Page 60

...with hostility everywhere. He who
disagrees with me on this point, I regard as infected. But...

Page 61

...the fourth
book? Or when he reads the granite sentences at the end of the third
book,...

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...indications of the proximity of something unparalleled;
for, after all, it shows the beginning of _Zarathustra,_...

Page 63

...be there again when he was revisiting this small forgotten
world of happiness for the last...

Page 64

...This is bad indeed; but, that we should regard
his worthiest aims and hopes with ill-concealed...

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...is an instinct for rhythmic relations which
embraces a whole world of forms (length, the need...

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...time I was obsessed by an unspeakably sad
melody, the refrain of which I recognised in...

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...revolt, I suffered,
in varying degrees of intensity, at the hands of almost every one who
came...

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...of Zarathustra's discourses.
The ladder upon which he rises and descends is of boundless length;
he has...

Page 69

...idea of Dionysus. Another consideration leads
to this idea. The psychological problem presented by the type...

Page 70

...than taking.

"Wretched am I that my hand may never rest from giving: an envious fate
is...

Page 71

...all gushing springs raise their voices. And my
soul too is a gushing spring.

"It is night:...

Page 72

...once came unto me!

"The beauty of the Superman came unto me as a shadow. Alas,...

Page 73

...reader will find the same _voluntary_ turning away from those
instincts which made a _Zarathustra_ a...

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...flourished
not because God was active behind the priests, as is generally
believed, but because it was...

Page 75

...joyful harbinger
of this culture._ ... On this account alone I am also a fatality.



3


Immediately after...

Page 76

...the Po,
for which Turin is famous, and of which Nietzsche was particularly
fond.--TR.]




"THE CASE OF WAGNER:...

Page 77

...the Germans are idealists.



2


But here nothing shall stop me from being rude, and from telling...

Page 78

...there,_--Luther, that cursed monk, not only restored the
Church, but, what was a thousand times worse,...

Page 79

...only
"_unconscious_" swindlers (this word applies to Fichte, Schelling,
Schopenhauer, Hegel, and Schleiermacher, just as well as...

Page 80

...form of a German. The first
thing I ask myself when I begin analysing a man,...

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...slightest hints I gather that they do not even know
what lies hidden in my books....

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...is my opinion that I am too
full of malice to believe even in myself; I...

Page 83

...has ever existed; but this does
not alter the fact that I shall become the most...

Page 84

...from a yea-saying attitude towards life.
Let me halt for a moment at the question of...

Page 85

...the cost of Truth and at the
cost of the Future.

"The good--they cannot create; they are...

Page 86

...the rest of mankind. No one hitherto
has felt Christian morality beneath him; to that end...

Page 87

...as
morality and as law, and remained suspended over man as the Categorical
Imperative. Fancy blundering in...

Page 88

...and after him. The lightning
flash of truth struck precisely that which theretofore had stood
highest: he...

Page 89

...him who says yea to life, to him who
is certain of the future, and who...

Page 90

...The hungry vulture valleyward flew screaming.

Yet didst thou err, foul bird,...

Page 91

... He trembles who beholds thine awful mask;
...

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...joy of friendship
Come thou nigh to aid me,
...

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... Summer, the boy with eyes so hot and weary,
...

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... Nor speak--

Twas at the noon,
...

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...What does your heart deplore?
And who, pray, would not fain,
...

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...still too much a girl!
My steering-wheel, so bright to see,
...

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...long road
Aimless and hateful!
Now life I'd double
...

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... Strangeness is to me too dear--
Genoa has sunk...

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...bridge I stood,
Mellow was the night,
Music came...

Page 100

...e'en a cruel glance would slay!
There it would lie, unsouled, poor...

Page 101

... Went to Cosmopolis.




TO THE DARWINIANS[4]


A...

Page 102

... Till from each cup of balm you poison drink,
...

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...one word as medicine,
My own prescription, in your ear,
...

Page 104

...become stingy in this drought;
Overflow thyself, trickle thy dew,
...

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... In his own juice,
Beneath his own summit,
...

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...be guest--
To be thy guest?

A bird of...

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...Watching,
Chewing,
One that stands upright no more!
...

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... Walks the purple of thy love,
Thy last hesitating...

Page 109

...Here under darkling heavens,
Zarathustra lights his mountain-fires,
A...

Page 110

...The pit profound with thunderous challenge fights
Against the heavens, midst clamorous...

Page 111

...are all virtuous, yea every one.
Virtue and fame are ever in...

Page 112

...I alone do love: thou art inviolate
To strokes of change and...

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...And since 'tis my will,
All goes as I wish--
...

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... Do ye fall heavy upon me!


38

Too...

Page 115

...to my hell
I'll pave the way myself with well-made maxims.


...

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...from woes
(Choose now I)
Sudden death
...

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...now he lies there, broken, useless, and cold.

72

...

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...86

Upright he stands
With more sense of "justice"
...

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... Can tell the truth.


104

Our...

Page 120

...You have lost!"
They follow all
That flatter them...