Early Greek Philosophy & Other Essays Collected Works, Volume Two

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...(Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)





EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY & OTHER ESSAYS

By

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

TRANSLATED BY

MAXIMILIAN...

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...delineates his ideal of woman. Penelope,
Antigone, Electra are his ideal types.

Plato's dictum that in the...

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...Fragmente der Vorsokratiker",
_Benn's, Burnet's_ and _Fairbanks'_ books we may regard as the
peristyle through which we...

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...is somewhat at a disadvantage through its lack
of a Noun-Infinitive. I can best illustrate this...

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...the beginning of
the Horatian Art of Poetry, is jumbled together out of pieces, here in
the...

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...on seeing
the Hera in Argos, to become himself a Polyklet; and just as little
would he...

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...of want.

Accordingly we must accept this cruel sounding truth, that _slavery
is of the essence of...

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...we may compare
this grand Culture with a blood-stained victor, who in his triumphal
procession carries the...

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...again we see with what pitiless inflexibility Nature, in order
to arrive at Society, forges for...

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...other interests in the service of this State-instinct; at the
best one might distinguish the men...

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...in
their heads they will promote _that_ policy which will offer the
greatest security to these purposes;...

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...once again war, in the emotions of which this at least
becomes obvious, that the State...

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...State, that of the creation of the military
genius. If we now imagine the military primal...

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...he did not place at the head _the_ genius in its
general meaning, but only the...

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..._Family was to cease._ At present let us
take no account of his abolishing even marriage,...

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...State, she had to step in as helper; the family as a
makeshift for the State...

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...species Nature speaks out of these instincts very distinctly.
How far this divining power reaches is...

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...even a
clearly represented action to the pure language of tones, although the
latter, being self-sufficient, needs...

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...us--as I am forced to insert here in
opposition to Schopenhauer--after a most rigid self-examination, not
according...

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...been too scanty or too unconditional--will now
have the advantage with us, of laying before himself...

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...referred, in order to be
refuted, to the musician who writes music to existing lyric poems;...

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...emotions, is to be said, that they will ever remain
in the entrance-hall, and will never...

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...longer any meaning; moreover it appears as an
offensive superficiality.

One must not think any the worse...

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...art, merely
as material for vocal music and does not stand to our musically
determined sensation in...

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...of the whole, which we, _without_ the diversion of music
and orchestration, so often cannot penetrate...

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...or bad opera-verses. The worst music can still mean, as
compared with the best poetry, the...

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...singers; and from this jugglery the judicious
listener turns away laughing. If the mass is diverted...

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...the big drum by good music, which, however,
must nevertheless have no purely musical, but only...

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...For me is ample guerdon." TR.


[2] A quotation from Goethe's "Faust": Part I., lines 91,...

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...we _did_ understand them thus.

But what lies, as the mother-womb of the Hellenic, _behind_ the...

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...more from ours than the _colouring,_
derived hence, of some ethical ideas, _e.g.,_ of _Eris_ and...

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...who as jealousy,
spite, envy, incites men to activity but not to the action of war...

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...to see that sentiment unashamed in its naïve expressions,
the sentiment as to the necessity of...

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...town's gods that he dedicated the wreaths which
the umpires as a mark of honour set...

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...deed, suddenly withdrawn from the contest and
became _hors de concours_ according to his, and his...

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...his fall and to crush him. Sparta and
Athens surrender to Persia, as Themistocles and Alcibiades...

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...true
virtuosi of philistinism the Germans are at home in narrowness of life,
discerning and judging; if...

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...an ambassadorial report,
into another's a date or an etymology or a pragmatic cobweb. Do you
really...

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...to
him! And if you are able to divine what kind of culture that would have
to...

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...strongly; whereas a complete enumeration of all possible
propositions handed down to us--as is the custom...

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...able to stop
at the right time, because that posterity in its uninstructed and
impetuous youth necessarily...

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...Life not to pedantic
knowledge, using everything learnt as a foothold whence to leap
high and still...

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...finding their own form and in
perfecting it by metamorphosis in its most minute details and...

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...of
life and the love for truth that only asks: What is the good of Life
at...

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...individuals or at
the best for groups of friends and disciples closely connected with
them. The activity...

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...artist who succeeded in throwing a lentil
through the eye of a needle have sufficient, with...

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...a culture; then you shall experience what Philosophy
can and will do."--



3.


Greek philosophy seems to begin...

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...help him across the stream.
What therefore carries philosophical thinking so quickly to its goal?
Does it...

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...far that he at least believed in water. As
a mathematician and astronomer he had grown...

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...begins with a legislation with respect to
greatness, she becomes a Nomenclator. "That is great," she...

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...of the sojourning in
sublime contemplations. The thought and its form are milestones on
the path towards...

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...The immortality and eternity of the Primordial-being lies
not in an infiniteness and inexhaustibility--as usually the...

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...curse of Becoming?"

Not every kind of life may have been welcome to a man who...

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...solving how out of the Indefinite the
Definite, out of the Eternal the Temporal, out of...

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...pleasure when he is able to contradict reason by means of a
truth gained intuitively, and...

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...very appropriately called in German
_Wirklichkeit_ (actuality)--a word which is far more expressive than
_Realität_ (reality).[2] That...

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...regulated by it. Just as every Greek fought as though
he alone were in the right,...

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...Are they immortal gods? Are they
separate beings working for themselves from the beginning and without
end?...

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...supposed to be the preliminary stages, the still more original
qualities. With their issuing forth from...

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...of being completely swallowed up by the fire as
satiety; and now to us remains the...

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...life other worlds. The child throws away his toys; but soon
he starts again in an...

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...is it now water, now earth?" then he would only just
answer: "It is a game,...

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...his path belongs to the nature of the philosopher.
His talents are the most rare, in...

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...of the great world-child,
Zeus. He had no need of men, not even for his discernments....

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...Parmenidean. The first period in Parmenides' own
philosophising bears still the signature of Anaximander; this
period produced...

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...another, and believed
that they were not all of the same kind, but ought to be...

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...we get into fog, into the mysticism of _qualitates occultæ,_
and even a little into mythology....

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...question and how to narrate, for
which reason Heraclitus reckoned him amongst the polyhistorians and
above all...

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...His unity scarcely had expression and word in common with
the one "Being" of Parmenides, and...

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...of judgment on the part of the masses, glorified
by playful antinomies and praised as the...

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...that plurality, diversity and variety of the empirically
known world, the change of its qualities, the...

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...of Uncertainty, only a board,
broad enough to lie on! Everything becoming, everything luxuriant,
varied, blossoming, deceiving,...

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...all things,
and so does the word "Not-Being." If however the Existence of the
things themselves be...

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...exist; for from such an assumption the contradictory
idea of a perfect Infinitude would result. Since...

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...an _Atomon_--an
impossible conception! All our conceptions, as soon as their
empirically-given content, drawn out of this...

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...and the untruth of the identity of "Being" and Thinking
could be demonstrated. Firstly, if the...

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...appearance of the world at the one time is quite different
from that at the other...

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...of qualities. But if
the world in fact is full of the most different qualities then...

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...never clash
together, never move, never attract one another, there exists between
them no causality, no bridge,...

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...and coherent, is therefore not allowed to assume as its
cause anything,--whereas all those Anaxagorean substances...

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...Kant in a similar case of an equal objection
would have answered: "I can, it is...

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...us
otherwise than they really are, then one would not be able to advance
any solid proposition...

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...there is none more troublesome than
the question as to the beginning of motion. For if...

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...conception which our
philosopher had with respect to the so-called "Becoming." For in
itself the state of...

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...substance preponderates and fills a
thing in greater mass than the others present? Experience shows, that
this...

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...the same as about the Indefinite of Anaximander,
as Aristotle does: it could be neither white...

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...out of
the Chaos might come a Cosmos? This can be only the effect of Motion,
and...

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...the course of this process
out of that Aërial mass, conglomerating in its interior, water is
separated,...

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...sense without
presumption: 'Give me matter and I will build a world out of it.'"



18


Suppose now,...

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...point.



19


Here of course one might ask, what fancy had at that time so suddenly
occurred to...

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...means
of ludicrous caricatures and ridiculous re-interpretations.

The greatest of all Anaxagoreans however is Pericles, the mightiest...

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...the cause
of Something"? (_causa efficiens_)--and not "What is the purpose of
Something"? (_causa finalis_). The Nous...

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...through intellect, and that that which man brings about only
under the guidance of the idea...

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...it, _i.e.,_ a latent motion of attraction.

Further: in order to explain that Chaos, a force...

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...already existed; were this greater unity
established, then this would again strive after a still greater...

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.... . . . ...

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...with the new Culture.

The Socratic scepticism is a weapon against the hitherto prevailing
culture and knowledge.




ON...

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...or the sharp teeth of beasts of prey. In man this art
of dissimulation reaches its...

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...legislature of language also gives the first laws of truth:
since here, for the first time,...

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...the pure ineffective truth) is also quite incomprehensible
to the creator of language and not worth...

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...We call a man "honest"; we ask, why has
he acted so honestly to-day? Our customary...

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...abstractions; he no longer suffers
himself to be carried away by sudden impressions, by sensations, he
first...

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...every wind. In
this way man as an architectural genius rises high above the bee;
she builds...

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...insect and the bird perceive a world different from
his own, and that the question, which...

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...to contradict one another.
How little does this resemble a product of fancy, for if it...

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...just a little over
one year to Eva König. A son was born and died the...

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...of waking man
as motley, irregular, inconsequentially incoherent, attractive, and
eternally new as the world of dreams...

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...the way to a poor individual coveting existence, and It fares forth
for plunder and booty...

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...of them, without even enforcing for himself happiness out of the
abstractions; whereas he strives after...