Beyond Good and Evil

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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BEYOND GOOD AND EVIL

By Friedrich Nietzsche


Translated by Helen Zimmern



TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE ABOUT THIS E-TEXT EDITION:

The following is a reprint of the Helen Zimmern translation from German
into English of "Beyond Good and Evil," as published in The Complete
Works of Friedrich Nietzsche (1909-1913). Some adaptations from the
original text were made to format it into an e-text. Italics in the
original book are capitalized in this e-text, except for most foreign
language phrases that were italicized. Original footnotes are put in
brackets "[]" at the points where they are cited in the text. Some
spellings were altered. "To-day" and "To-morrow" are spelled "today"
and "tomorrow." Some words containing the letters "ise" in the original
text, such as "idealise," had these letters changed to "ize," such as
"idealize." "Sceptic" was changed to "skeptic."


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE
BEYOND GOOD AND EVIL

CHAPTER I: PREJUDICES OF PHILOSOPHERS
CHAPTER II: THE FREE SPIRIT
CHAPTER III: THE RELIGIOUS MOOD
CHAPTER IV: APOPHTHEGMS AND INTERLUDES
CHAPTER V: THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MORALS
CHAPTER VI: WE SCHOLARS
CHAPTER VII: OUR VIRTUES
CHAPTER VIII: PEOPLES AND COUNTRIES
CHAPTER IX: WHAT IS NOBLE?

FROM THE HEIGHTS (POEM TRANSLATED BY L.A. MAGNUS)




PREFACE


SUPPOSING that Truth is a woman--what then? Is there not ground
for suspecting that all philosophers, in so far as they have been
dogmatists, have failed to understand women--that the terrible
seriousness and clumsy importunity with which they have usually paid
their addresses to Truth, have been unskilled and unseemly methods for
winning a woman? Certainly she has never allowed herself to be won; and
at present every kind of dogma stands with sad and discouraged mien--IF,
indeed, it stands at all! For there are scoffers who maintain that it
has fallen, that all dogma lies on the ground--nay more, that it is at
its last gasp. But to speak seriously, there are good grounds for hoping
that all dogmatizing in philosophy, whatever solemn, whatever conclusive
and decided airs it has assumed, may have been only a noble puerilism
and tyronism; and probably the time is at hand when it will be once
and again understood WHAT has actually sufficed for the basis of such
imposing and absolute philosophical edifices as the dogmatists have
hitherto reared: perhaps some popular superstition of immemorial time
(such

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Text Comparison with The Case of Wagner Complete Works, Volume 8

Page 1
Nietzsche's ambition, throughout his life, was to regenerate European culture.
Page 5
An altogether special interest now attaches to these pamphlets; for, in the first place we are at last in possession of Wagner's own account of his development, his art, his aspirations and his struggles, in the amazing self-revelation entitled _My Life_[5]; and secondly, we now have _Ecce Homo,_ Nietzsche's autobiography, in which we learn for the first time from Nietzsche's own pen to what extent his history was that of a double devotion--to Wagner on the one hand, and to his own life task, the Transvaluation of all Values, on the other.
Page 9
It must not be astonished to find a disparity between the hero's private life and his "elevating" art or romantic and idealistic gospel.
Page 19
Wagner is a great corrupter of music.
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8.
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It is not Corneille's public that Wagner has to consider, it is merely the nineteenth century.
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And I do not mention Heine--l'_adorable Heine,_ as they say in Paris--who long since has passed into the flesh and blood of the more profound and more soulful of French lyricists.
Page 53
_ Only great suffering is the ultimate emancipator of spirit; for it teaches one that _vast suspiciousness_ which makes an X out of every U, a genuine and proper X, _i.
Page 65
In short, ninety-nine philologists out of a hundred _should_ not be philologists at all.
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--TR.
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35 It is the same with the simplicity of antiquity as it is with the simplicity of style: it is the highest thing which we recognise and must imitate; but it is also the last Let it be remembered that the classic prose of the Greeks is also a late result 36 What a mockery of the study of the "humanities" lies in the fact that they were also called "belles lettres" (bellas litteras)! 37 Wolfs[5] reasons why the Egyptians, Hebrews Persians, and other Oriental nations were not to be set on the same plane with the Greeks and Romans: "The former have either not raised themselves, or have raised themselves only to a slight extent, above that type of culture which should be called a mere civilisation and bourgeois acquirement, as opposed to the higher and true culture of the mind.
Page 87
96 People really do compare our own age with that of Pericles, and congratulate themselves on the reawakening of the feeling of patriotism: I remember a parody on the funeral oration of Pericles by G.
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g.
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150 At the twilight of antiquity there were still wholly unchristian figures, which were more beautiful, harmonious, and pure than those of any Christians: _e.
Page 95
155 Up to the present time all history has been written from the standpoint of success, and, indeed, with the assumption of a certain reason in this success.
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167 All religions are, in the end, based upon certain physical assumptions, which are already in existence and adapt the religions to their needs: for example, in Christianity, the contrast between body and soul, the unlimited importance of the earth as the "world," the marvellous occurrences in nature.