Beyond Good and Evil

By Friedrich Nietzsche

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...BEYOND GOOD AND EVIL

By Friedrich Nietzsche


Translated by Helen Zimmern



TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE ABOUT THIS E-TEXT EDITION:

The following...

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...as the soul-superstition, which, in the form of subject- and
ego-superstition, has not yet ceased doing...

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...credit to them! but they again made things square--they
invented printing.) But we, who are neither...

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...their source, and nowhere else!"--This
mode of reasoning discloses the typical prejudice by which
metaphysicians of all...

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...maintenance of a definite
mode of life For example, that the certain is worth more than...

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...which he entices us into the dialectic
by-ways that lead (more correctly mislead) to his "categorical
imperative"--makes...

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...a mushroom specialist, or a chemist; he is not
CHARACTERISED by becoming this or that. In...

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...Nature "according to the Stoa," and would
like everything to be made after your own image,...

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...by which they could live
better, that is to say, more vigorously and more joyously, than...

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...of the
Tubingen institution went immediately into the groves--all seeking for
"faculties." And what did they not...

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...the best-refuted
theories that have been advanced, and in Europe there is now perhaps
no one in...

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...everywhere else,
let us beware of SUPERFLUOUS teleological principles!--one of which
is the instinct of self-preservation (we...

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...organs! It seems to me that this is a
complete REDUCTIO AD ABSURDUM, if the conception...

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...a smile and two notes of
interrogation in a philosopher nowadays. "Sir," the philosopher will
perhaps give...

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...say that in all willing there is firstly a plurality of sensations,
namely, the sensation of...

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...a fair amount of certainty that will and action are
somehow one; he ascribes the success,...

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...grammatical
functions--it cannot but be that everything is prepared at the outset
for a similar development and...

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...wills.--It is almost always
a symptom of what is lacking in himself, when a thinker, in...

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...laws obtain in it, but because they are
absolutely LACKING, and every power effects its ultimate...

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...psychology
is once more the path to the fundamental problems.



CHAPTER II. THE FREE SPIRIT


24. O sancta...

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...truthfulness in every little interrogative mark
which you place after your special words and favourite doctrines...

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...of elevated tastes;
supposing, however, that he does not voluntarily take all this burden
and disgust upon...

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...For the
indignant man, and he who perpetually tears and lacerates himself with
his own teeth (or,...

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...comedy-writers--Lessing loved also free-spiritism in the TEMPO,
and flight out of Germany. But how could the...

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...in short, wherever people believed in gradations of rank and
NOT in equality and equal rights--are...

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...and deceptive. Later on, when the young soul, tortured by
continual disillusions, finally turns suspiciously against...

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...the reversing
and fundamental shifting of values, owing to a new self-consciousness
and acuteness in man--is it...

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...reason in the end to become
distrustful also of all thinking; has it not hitherto been...

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...this "belong" also belong to the fiction?
Is it not at length permitted to be a...

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...not just the power of will, the effect of will.
Granted, finally, that we succeeded in...

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...moralists are silent. Perhaps
severity and craft are more favourable conditions for the development of
strong, independent...

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...his eyes will some day be
opened to the fact that there is nevertheless a mask...

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...truth for every one--that which has hitherto been the secret wish
and ultimate purpose of all...

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...which must be
DONE AWAY WITH. We opposite ones, however, who have opened our eye and
conscience...

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...spendthrifts, arrangers and collectors from morning till
night, misers of our wealth and our full-crammed drawers,...

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...reward in heaven, and already upon
earth.

46. Faith, such as early Christianity desired, and not infrequently
achieved...

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...dangerous prescriptions as to regimen:
solitude, fasting, and sexual abstinence--but without its being possible
to determine with...

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...an error of
interpretation? A lack of philology?

48. It seems that the Latin races are far...

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...superior kind of man who takes SUCH an attitude
towards nature and life.--Later on, when the...

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...is himself only a slender,
tame house-animal, and knows only the wants of a house-animal (like
our...

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...may not always have been strange
to him,--the thought which once had an immense power on...

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...has exercised
its acuteness and profundity has just been an occasion for its exercise,
something of a...

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...gives
psychologists new and more subtle puzzles to solve). On the part of
pious, or merely church-going...

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...of life only in trying
to FALSIFY its image (as if taking wearisome revenge on it),...

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...in the
case of the unique natures of noble origin, if by virtue of superior
spirituality they...

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...the philosopher, but
rule voluntarily and PARAMOUNTLY, when they wish to be the final end,
and not...

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..."man"--into uncertainty, distress
of conscience, and self-destruction; forsooth, to invert all love of the
earthly and of...

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...memory. "I could not have done that," says my
pride, and remains inexorable. Eventually--the memory yields.

69....

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...to their
surface, precisely by that which makes others heavy--by hatred and love.

91. So cold, so...

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...who feels himself preordained to contemplation and not to
belief, all believers are too noisy and...

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...love only themselves (or their own ideal, to
express it more agreeably). Thus man wishes woman...

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...a tragedy; around the
demigod everything becomes a satyr-play; and around God everything
becomes--what? perhaps a "world"?

151....

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...of its wheels
insupportable!

175. One loves ultimately one's desires, not the thing desired.

176. The vanity of...

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...moral facts imperfectly, in an arbitrary
epitome, or an accidental abridgement--perhaps as the morality of
their environment,...

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...which are
meant to justify their author in the eyes of other people; other systems
of morals...

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...it once more), that there should be long OBEDIENCE
in the same direction, there thereby results,...

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...of ENGLISH instinct to hallow and begloom Sunday to such
an extent that the Englishman unconsciously...

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...and "Knowledge," or more
plainly, of instinct and reason--the question whether, in respect to the
valuation of...

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...than to seize upon
the divergence and novelty of an impression: the latter requires more
force, more...

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...of the power and art of flying as his privilege and his
peculiarly enviable happiness; such...

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...the people: "I must,
therefore, MAKE myself known, and first of all learn to know myself!"
Among...

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...there is
a hatred of the virgin forest and of the tropics among moralists? And
that the...

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...small number who command--in view, therefore, of the fact that
obedience has been most practiced and...

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...happiness to which the entire century has attained in its
worthiest individuals and periods.

200. The man...

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...period of the Romans; and should
it be praised, a sort of resentful disdain is compatible...

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...part of the CRIMINAL,
and does so, in fact, seriously and honestly. To punish, appears to...

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...Against such a "possibility," against such a "should
be," however, this morality defends itself with all...

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...political organization, but
as equivalent to a degenerating, a waning type of man, as involving his
mediocrising...

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...to be compared.
He sees at a glance all that could still BE MADE OUT OF...

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...philosophers from young
naturalists and old physicians (not to mention the most cultured and
most conceited of...

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...to implant a
dangerous distrust in the soul of a young and ambitious scholar those
philosophers, at...

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...believe that it is his right and even his duty to obtain
this verdict, and he...

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...FLOW; and precisely before the man of the great current he
stands all the colder and...

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...himself to reflect on his
suffering, but in vain! His thoughts already rove away to the...

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...potter's-form, that must wait for some kind of content
and frame to "shape" itself thereto--for the...

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...and in truth he needs some consolation. For skepticism is
the most spiritual expression of a...

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...what it wants, and must first show whether it can exercise
will, but it is strongest...

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...in the background the great bloodsucker, the
spider skepticism; he suspected the incurable wretchedness of a...

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...trait suggests the question whether they must not perhaps
be skeptics in the last-mentioned sense, something...

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...that "philosophy itself is
criticism and critical science--and nothing else whatever!" Though this
estimate of philosophy may...

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...a law-giving, their will to truth is--WILL TO POWER.--Are there at
present such philosophers? Have there...

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...who had continually on their lips the old pompous
words to which they had long forfeited...

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...the same thing to them; such only has been
their "experience."--Artists have here perhaps a finer...

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...with our most ardent requirements:
well, then, let us look for them in our labyrinths!--where, as...

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...the forgetful: for they "get the better" even of
their blunders.

218. The psychologists of France--and where...

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..."disinterested person" is so popular
one must--probably not without some danger--get an idea of WHAT people
actually...

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...moralistic pedant
and bonhomme. Did he perhaps deserve to be laughed at when he thus
exhorted systems...

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...which a people, a
community, or an individual has lived, the "divining instinct" for the
relationships of...

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...motleyness, this
medley of the most delicate, the most coarse, and the most artificial,
with a secret...

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...for the hereditarily vicious and defective who lie
on the ground around us; still less is...

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...dance in our "chains" and betwixt our "swords"; it
is none the less true that more...

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...It
is desirable that as few people as possible should reflect upon morals,
and consequently it is...

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...at all grasped, but is only a
nostrum,--that what is fair to one MAY NOT at...

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...the Parisian suburbs who has a homesickness for bloody revolutions,
the Wagnerienne who, with unhinged will,...

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...a suddenly adopted preference
of ignorance, of arbitrary shutting out, a closing of windows, an inner
denial...

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...pride. But we
anchorites and marmots have long ago persuaded ourselves in all the
secrecy of an...

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...bring
to light! Woman has so much cause for shame; in woman there is so
much pedantry,...

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...that
it betrays bad taste--when a woman refers to Madame Roland, or Madame de
Stael, or Monsieur...

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...and obligations: that is a TYPICAL sign of
shallow-mindedness; and a thinker who has proved himself...

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...realises
itself with terrible obviousness: WOMAN RETROGRADES. Since the French
Revolution the influence of woman in Europe...

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...WILL--have
always kept pace with one another, and that the most powerful and
influential women in the...

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...his mastery of the expedients here
employed, the new, newly acquired, imperfectly tested expedients of art
which...

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...more
prudent and conservative ones do not meanwhile give up the old belief
that it is only...

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...power
of adaptation as his typical distinction. This process of the EVOLVING
EUROPEAN, which can be retarded...

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...and super-imposed, rather
than actually built: this is owing to its origin. A German who would
embolden...

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...hit in the great domain
of philosophical formulas,--a ruling idea, which, together with German
beer and German...

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...his longing for the elegant, the
amorous, the tripping, the tearful, and his belief in the...

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...his taste, which was fundamentally a PETTY
taste (that is to say, a dangerous propensity--doubly dangerous...

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...musicians themselves
write badly. The German does not read aloud, he does not read for the
ear,...

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...does not take root in German hearts, as the Bible has
done.

248. There are two kinds...

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...listen
to the following:--I have never yet met a German who was favourably
inclined to the Jews;...

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...planning for that end is equally certain. Meanwhile, they
rather wish and desire, even somewhat importunely,...

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...he has all the
MORE NEED of Christianity. To finer nostrils, this English Christianity
itself has still...

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...be unfavourable for arriving at them.--Finally, let
it not be forgotten that the English, with their...

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...one can safely predict that beforehand,--it is already
taking place sufficiently! There are, however, three things...

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...which bids me wait and wait, but not yet
hope).--There is also still in France a...

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...EUROPE WISHES TO BE ONE,
are now overlooked, or arbitrarily and falsely misinterpreted. With all
the more...

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...ambitious and
insatiable, without equilibrium and enjoyment; all of them finally
shattering and sinking down at the...

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...an
aristocratic society and so it will always be--a society believing in
a long scale of gradations...

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...commonwealth, but
as the SIGNIFICANCE and highest justification thereof--that it should
therefore accept with a good conscience...

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...they promised to invent a mode of life which should
refrain from all organic functions. "Exploitation"...

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...to be approved of; he passes the judgment: "What is
injurious to me is injurious in...

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...place. The ability and obligation to
exercise prolonged gratitude and prolonged revenge--both only within the
circle of...

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...in reverence and devotion are the regular symptoms of an
aristocratic mode of thinking and estimating.--Hence...

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...bad
and unjust one (think, for instance, of the greater part of the
self-appreciations and self-depreciations which...

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...that
it still exists, in spite of all Gods and men, and has hitherto been
victorious: these...

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...other, decay,
deterioration, and the loftiest desires frightfully entangled, the
genius of the race overflowing from all...

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...way in which, on
the whole, the reverence for the BIBLE has hitherto been maintained
in Europe,...

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..."education" and "culture" MUST
be essentially the art of deceiving--deceiving with regard to origin,
with regard to...

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...latter-day civilizations. I have no doubt that an ancient
Greek, also, would first of all remark...

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...potent of all the forces which
have hitherto operated upon mankind. The more similar, the more...

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...discoverer, are disguised in
their creations until they are unrecognizable; the "work" of the artist,
of the...

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...last, enlightened
about human love, had to invent a God who is entire love, entire
CAPACITY for...

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...ardour or thirst which perpetually impels the soul out
of night into the morning, and out...

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...low in him, and in the foreground--and thereby
betrays himself.

276. In all kinds of injury and...

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...therein? Probably; but fortunately nothing for my own
teeth.--Perhaps it betrays the species to which I...

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...For solitude is a virtue with us, as
a sublime bent and bias to purity, which...

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...ENTHUSIASM, including what belongs to it, for
instance, virtue. For as Galiani said, who was obliged...

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...who constantly experiences, sees,
hears, suspects, hopes, and dreams extraordinary things; who is struck
by his own...

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...as that great mysterious one possesses
it, the tempter-god and born rat-catcher of consciences, whose voice...

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...God, and, as I said, from mouth to mouth--I, the last
disciple and initiate of the...

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...you were so variegated, young and malicious, so full of thorns
and secret spices, that you...

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... 3.

My table was...

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...pale, filled o'er
...

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... Friends' phantom-flight
...

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... Our aims self-same:
The Guest of Guests, friend...