Also sprach Zarathustra: Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 135

zwei Meeren wandelt, -

zwischen Vergangenem und Zukünftigem als schwere Wolke wandelt, -
schwülen Niederungen feind und Allem, was müde ist und nicht sterben,
noch leben kann.-

zum Blitze bereit im dunklen Busen und zum erlösenden Lichtstrahle,
schwanger von Blitzen, die Ja! sagen, Ja! lachen, zu wahrsagerischen
Blitzstrahlen: -

- selig aber ist der also Schwangere! Und wahrlich, lange muss als
schweres Wetter am Berge hängen, wer einst das Licht der Zukunft
zünden soll! -

Oh wie sollte ich nicht nach der Ewigkeit brünstig sein und nach dem
hochzeitlichen Ring der Ringe, - dem Ring de Wiederkunft!

Nie noch fand ich das Weib, von dem ich Kinder mochte, sei denn dieses
Weib, das ich lieb: denn ich liebe dich, oh Ewigkeit!

Denn ich liebe dich, oh Ewigkeit!


2.

Wenn mein Zorn je Gräber brach, Grenzsteine rückte und alte Tafeln
zerbrochen in steile Tiefen rollte:

Wenn mein Hohn je vermoderte Worte zerblies, und ich wie ein Besen kam
den Kreuzspinnen und als Fegewind alten verdumpften Grabkammern:

Wenn ich je frohlockend sass, wo alte Götter begraben liegen,
weltsegnend, weltliebend neben den Denkmalen alter Welt-Verleumder: -

- denn selbst Kirchen und Gottes-Gräber liebe ich, wenn der Himmel
erst reinen Auges durch ihre zerbrochenen Decken blickt; gern sitze
ich gleich Gras und rothem Mohne auf zerbrochnen Kirchen -

Oh wie sollte ich nicht nach der Ewigkeit brünstig sein und nach dem
hochzeitlichen Ring der Ringe, - dem Ring de Wiederkunft!

Nie noch fand ich das Weib, von dem ich Kinder mochte, sei denn dieses
Weib, das ich lieb: denn ich liebe dich, oh Ewigkeit!

Denn ich liebe dich, oh Ewigkeit!


3.

Wenn je ein Hauch zu mir kam vom schöpferischen Hauche und von jener
himmlischen Noth, die noch Zufälle zwingt, Sternen-Reigen zu tanzen:

Wenn ich je mit dem Lachen des schöpferischen Blitzes lachte, dem der
lange Donner der That grollend, aber gehorsam nachfolgt:

Wenn ich je am Göttertisch der Erde mit Göttern Würfel spielte, dass
die Erde bebte und brach und Feuerflüsse heraufschnob: -

- denn ein Göttertisch ist die Erde, und zitternd von schöpferischen
neuen Worten und Götter-Würfen: -

Oh wie sollte ich nicht nach der Ewigkeit brünstig sein und nach dem
hochzeitlichen Ring der Ringe, - dem Ring de Wiederkunft!

Nie noch fand ich das Weib, von dem ich Kinder mochte, sei denn dieses
Weib, das ich lieb: denn ich liebe dich, oh Ewigkeit!

Denn ich liebe dich, oh Ewigkeit!


4.

Wenn ich je vollen Zuges trank aus jenem schäumenden Würz- und
Mischkruge, in dem alle Dinge gut gemischt sind:

Wenn meine Hand je Fernstes zum Nächsten goss und Feuer zu Geist und
Lust zu Leid und Schlimmstes zum Gütigsten:

Wenn ich selber ein Korn bin von jenem erlösenden Salze, welches
macht,

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Text Comparison with Thoughts out of Season, Part I

Page 2
It may indeed be safely predicted that once the English people have recovered from the first shock of Nietzsche's thoughts, their biblical training will enable them, more than any other nation, to appreciate the deep piety underlying Nietzsche's Cause.
Page 15
" When the whole of Germany was delirious with joy over her victory, at a time when the unquestioned triumph of her arms tended rather to reflect unearned glory upon every department of her social organisation, it required both courage and discernment to raise the warning voice and to apply the wet blanket.
Page 19
Nietzsche is writing about Wagner's music, and he says: "The world must indeed be empty for him who has never been unhealthy enough for this 'infernal voluptuousness'; it is allowable and yet almost forbidden to use a mystical expression in this behalf.
Page 29
It expatiated upon the rationalism of all reality, and thus ingratiated itself with the Culture-Philistine, who also loves neat twists and flourishes, and who, above all, considers himself real, and regards his reality as the standard of reason for the world.
Page 31
We are now in possession of information concerning two matters from one of the initiated: first, that these "We" stand beyond the passion for beauty; secondly, that their position was reached by means of weakness.
Page 35
And I do indeed call this a result! The doctor, the drug, and the disease--everything forgotten! And the joyous laughter! The continual provocation to hilarity! You are to be envied, Sir; for you have founded the most attractive of all religions --one whose followers do honour to its founder by laughing at him.
Page 40
Apropos of this, I might adduce an instructive and somewhat forbidding example.
Page 48
430).
Page 61
"In spite of it all, he is still a classical writer.
Page 65
If he regarded scholars and educated men as his most probable audience, experience ought certainly to have told him that whereas one can shoot such men down with the heavy guns of scientific proof, but cannot make them surrender, they may be got to capitulate all the more quickly before "lightly equipped" measures of seduction.
Page 72
But the manufacturers of these newspapers are, by virtue of.
Page 83
In his case there were no hereditary or family influences at work to constrain him to the sedulous study of one particular art.
Page 88
He must have felt like a nocturnal traveller, broken with fatigue, exasperated from want of sleep, and tramping wearily along beneath a heavy burden, who, far from fearing the sudden approach of death, rather longs for it as something exquisitely charming.
Page 97
Day and battle dawn together, the sacred shadows vanish, and Art is once more far away from us; but the comfort she dispenses is with men from the earliest hour of day, and never leaves them.
Page 103
But if he can do more than condemn.
Page 120
And yet there is something still more wonderful than this work, and that is the artist himself, the man who, shortly after he had accomplished it, was able to create a picture of life so full of clashing colours as the Meistersingers of Nurnberg, and who in both of these compositions seems merely to have refreshed and equipped himself for the task of completing at his ease that gigantic edifice in four parts which he had long ago planned and begun--the ultimate result of all his meditations and poetical flights for over twenty years, his Bayreuth masterpiece, the Ring of the Nibelung! He who marvels at the rapid succession of the two operas, Tristan and the Meistersingers, has failed to understand one important side of the life and nature of all great Germans: he does not know the peculiar soil out of which that essentially German gaiety, which characterised Luther, Beethoven, and Wagner, can grow, the gaiety which other nations quite fail to understand and which even seems to be missing in the Germans of to-day--that clear golden and thoroughly fermented mixture of simplicity, deeply discriminating love, observation, and roguishness which Wagner has dispensed, as the most precious of drinks, to all those who have suffered deeply through life, but who nevertheless return to it with the smile of convalescents.
Page 121
something occurred which he could only understand as a symbol: it was as much as a new comfort and a new token of happiness to him.
Page 124
And every one whose innermost soul has a presentiment of this, every one unto whom the yoke of tragic deception concerning the aim of life, the distortion and shattering of intentions, renunciation and purification through love, are not unknown things, must be conscious of a vague reminiscence of Wagner's own heroic life, in the masterpieces with which the great man now presents us.
Page 139
" That an art could arise which would be so clear and warm as to flood the base and the poor in spirit with its light, as well as to melt the haughtiness of the learned--such a phenomenon had to be experienced though it could not be guessed.
Page 143
And at the sight of his magnificent development and bloom, the loathing leaves otan's soul, and he follows the hero's history with the eye of fatherly love and anxiety.