Ainsi Parlait Zarathoustra

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 28

noblesse de l'esclave. Que votre noblesse soit
l'obéissance! Que votre commandement lui-même soit de l'obéissance!

Un bon guerrier préfère "tu dois" à "je veux". Et vous devez vous
faire commander tout ce que vous aimez.

Que votre amour de la vie soit l'amour de vos plus hautes espérances:
et que votre plus haute espérance soit la plus haute pensée de la vie.

Votre plus haute pensée, permettez que je vous la commande - la voici:
l'homme est quelque chose qui doit être surmonté.

Ainsi vivez votre vie d'obéissance et de guerre! Qu'importe la vie
longue! Quel guerrier veut être ménagé!

Je ne vous ménage point, je vous aime du fond du coeur, mes frères en
la guerre! -


Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra.





DE LA NOUVELLE IDOLE


Il y a quelque part encore des peuples et des troupeaux, mais ce n'est
pas chez nous, mes frères: chez nous il y a des États.

État? Qu'est-ce, cela? Allons! Ouvrez les oreilles, je vais vous
parler de la mort des peuples.

L'État, c'est le plus froid de tous les monstres froids: il ment
froidement et voici le mensonge qui rampe de sa bouche: "Moi, l'État,
je suis le Peuple."

C'est un mensonge! Ils étaient des créateurs, ceux qui créèrent les
peuples et qui suspendirent au-dessus des peuples une foi et un amour:
ainsi ils servaient la vie.

Ce sont des destructeurs, ceux qui tendent des pièges au grand nombre
et qui appellent cela un État: ils suspendent au-dessus d'eux un glaive
et cent appétits.

Partout où il y a encore du peuple, il ne comprend pas l'État et il le
déteste comme le mauvais oeil et une dérogation aux coutumes et aux
lois.

Je vous donne ce signe: chaque peuple a son langage du bien et du mal:
son voisin ne le comprend pas. Il s'est inventé ce langage pour ses
coutumes et ses lois.

Mais l'État ment dans toutes ses langues du bien et du mal; et, dans
tout ce qu'il dit, il ment - et tout ce qu'il a, il l'a volé.

Tout en lui est faux; il mord avec des dents volées, le hargneux. Même
ses entrailles sont falsifiées.

Une confusion des langues du bien et du mal - je vous donne ce signe,
comme le signe de l'État. En vérité, c'est la volonté de la mort
qu'indique ce signe, il appelle les prédicateurs de la mort!

Beaucoup trop d'hommes viennent au monde: l'État a été inventé pour
ceux qui sont superflus!

Voyez donc comme il les attire, les superflus! Comme il les enlace,
comme il les mâche et les remâche.

"Il

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Text Comparison with The Twilight of the Idols - The Antichrist Complete Works, Volume Sixteen

Page 0
FOULIS 13 & 15 FREDERICK STREET EDINBURGH: AND LONDON 1911 CONTENTS TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE PREFACE MAXIMS AND MISSILES THE PROBLEM OF SOCRATES "REASON" IN PHILOSOPHY HOW THE "TRUE WORLD" ULTIMATELY BECAME A FABLE MORALITY AS THE ENEMY OF NATURE THE FOUR GREAT ERRORS THE "IMPROVERS" OF MANKIND THINGS THE GERMANS LACK SKIRMISHES IN A WAR WITH THE ACT THINGS I OWE TO THE ANCIENTS THE ANTICHRIST ETERNAL RECURRENCE NOTES TO ZARATHUSTRA TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE _The Twilight of the Idols_ was written towards the end of the summer of 1888, its composition seems to have occupied only a few days,--so few indeed that, in _Ecce Homo_ (p.
Page 1
On the contrary, I very much fear that, unless the reader is well prepared, not only in Nietzscheism, but also in the habit of grappling with uncommon and elusive problems, a good deal of the contents of this work will tend rather to confuse than to enlighten him in regard to what Nietzsche actually wishes to make clear in these pages.
Page 20
Or unconscious gratitude for a good digestion (sometimes called "brotherly love").
Page 22
And to this end they denied the world! No slight form of insanity! No modest form of immodesty! Morality, in so far it condemns _per se,_ and _not_ out of any aim, consideration or motive of life, is a specific error, for which no one should feel any mercy, a degenerate idiosyncrasy, that has done an unutterable amount of harm.
Page 44
_--This man knows mankind: to what purpose does he study his fellows? He wants to derive some small or even great advantages from them,--he is a politician!.
Page 48
With an innocence for which a man must be Greek and not "Christian," he says that there would be no such thing as Platonic philosophy if there were not such beautiful boys in Athens: it was the sight of them alone that set the soul of the philosopher reeling with erotic passion, and allowed it no rest until it had planted the seeds of all lofty things in a soil so beautiful.
Page 51
33 _The Natural Value of Egoism.
Page 57
moderns with our anxious care of ourselves and love of our neighbours, with all our unassuming virtues of industry, equity, and scientific method--with our lust of collection, of economy and of mechanism--represent a _weak_ age.
Page 63
Society puts a ban upon his virtues; the most spirited instincts inherent in him immediately become involved with the depressing passions, with suspicion, fear and dishonour.
Page 64
It has been said, and not without subtlety:--_il est indigne des grands cœurs de répandre le trouble qu'ils ressentent[8]:_ but it is necessary to add that there may also be _grandeur de cœur_ in not shrinking _from the most undignified proceeding.
Page 81
Our objects, our practices, our calm, cautious distrustful manner--everything about us seemed to them absolutely despicable and beneath contempt After all, it might be asked with some justice, whether the thing which kept mankind blindfold so long, were not an æsthetic taste: what they demanded of truth was a _picturesque_ effect, and from the man of science what they expected was that he should make a forcible appeal to their senses.
Page 88
by means of prayer; while the highest thing is regarded as unattainable, as a gift, as an act of "grace" Here plain dealing is also entirely lacking: concealment and the darkened room are Christian.
Page 89
If for example it give anyone pleasure to believe himself delivered from sin, it is _not_ a necessary prerequisite thereto that he should be sinful, but only that he should _feel_ sinful.
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.
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The poison of the doctrine "_equal_ rights for all"--has been dispensed with the greatest thoroughness by Christianity: Christianity, prompted by the most secret recesses of bad instincts, has waged a deadly war upon all feeling of reverence and distance between man and man--that is to say, the _prerequisite_ of all elevation, of every growth in culture; out of the resentment of the masses it wrought its _principal weapons_ against us, against everything noble, joyful, exalted on earth, against our happiness on earth.
Page 116
"Faith" as an imperative is a _veto_ against science,--_in praxi,_ it means lies at any price.
Page 122
the intellect, not to speak of decent feeling, ought at least to lead these interpreters to convince themselves of the absolute childishness and unworthiness of any such abuse of the dexterity of God's fingers.
Page 143
and for evermore, so that the origin of the mechanical world would be a lawless game which would ultimately acquire such consistency as the organic laws seem to have now from our point of view? So that all our mechanical laws would be not eternal, but evolved, and would have survived innumerable different mechanical laws, or that they had attained supremacy in isolated corners of the world and not in others?--It would seem that we need caprice, actual lawlessness, and only a capacity for law, a primeval state of stupidity which is not even able to concern itself with mechanics? The origin of qualities presupposes the existence of quantities, and these, for their part, might arise from a thousand kinds of mechanical processes.
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I wished to live, consequently it had to die.
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