Ainsi Parlait Zarathoustra

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 159

le feu à
l'esprit, la joie à la peine et les pires choses aux meilleures:

Si je suis moi-même un grain de ce sable rédempteur, qui fait que
toutes choses se mêlent bien dans la cruche des mixtures: - car il
existe un sel qui lie le bien au mal; et le mal lui-même est digne de
servir d'épice et de faire déborder l'écume de la cruche: -

O comment ne serais-je pas ardent de l'éternité, ardent du nuptial
anneau des anneaux, - l'anneau du devenir et du retour?

Jamais encore je n'ai trouvé la femme de qui je voudrais avoir des
enfants, si ce n'est cette femme que j'aime: car je t'aime, ô éternité!

Car je t'aime, ô Éternité!


5.


Si j'aime la mer et tout ce qui ressemble à la mer et le plus encore
quand fougueuse elle me contredit:

Si je porte en moi cette joie du chercheur, cette joie qui pousse la
voile vers l'inconnu, s'il y a dans ma joie une joie de navigateur:

Si jamais mon allégresse s'écria: "Les côtes ont disparu - maintenant
ma dernière chaîne est tombée - l'immensité sans bornes bouillonne
autour de moi, bien loin de moi scintillent le temps et l'espace,
allons! en route! Vieux coeur!" -

O comment ne serais-je pas ardent de l'éternité, ardent du nuptial
anneau des anneaux, - l'anneau du devenir et du retour?

Jamais encore je n'ai trouvé la femme de qui je voudrais avoir des
enfants, si ce n'est cette femme que j'aime: car je t'aime, ô éternité!

Car je t'aime, ô Éternité!


6.


Si ma vertu est une vertu de danseur, si souvent des deux pieds j'ai
sauté dans des ravissements d'or et d'émeraude:

Si ma méchanceté est une méchanceté riante qui se sent chez elle sous
des branches de roses et des haies de lys: - car dans le rire tout ce
qui est méchant se trouve ensemble, mais sanctifié et affranchi par sa
propre béatitude:

Et ceci est mon alpha et mon oméga, que tout ce qui est lourd devienne
léger, que tout corps devienne danseur, tout esprit oiseau: et, en
vérité, ceci est mon alpha et mon oméga! -

O comment ne serais-je pas ardent de l'éternité, ardent du nuptial
anneau des anneaux, l'anneau du devenir et du retour?

Jamais encore je n'ai trouvé la femme de qui je voudrais avoir des
enfants, si ce n'est cette femme que j'aime: car je t'aime, ô éternité!

Car je t'aime, ô Éternité!


7.


Si jamais j'ai déployé des ciels tranquilles au-dessus de moi, volant
de mes propres ailes dans mon propre ciel:

Si j'ai nagé en me jouant dans de profonds lointains de lumière,

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" 285.
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A.