Ainsi Parlait Zarathoustra

By Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 104

d'humeur. Ce courage
me fit enfin m'arrêter et dire: "Nain! L'un de nous deux doit
disparaître, toi, ou bien moi!" -

Car le courage est le meilleur meurtrier, - le courage qui _attaque_:
car dans toute attaque il y a une fanfare.

L'homme cependant est la bête la plus courageuse, c'est ainsi qu'il a
vaincu toutes les bêtes. Au son de la fanfare, il a surmonté toutes
les douleurs; mais la douleur humaine est la plus profonde douleur.

Le courage tue aussi le vertige au bord des abîmes: et où l'homme ne
serait-il pas au bord des abîmes? Ne suffit-il pas de regarder - pour
regarder des abîmes?

Le courage est le meilleur des meurtriers: le courage tue aussi la
pitié. Et la pitié est l'abîme le plus profond: l'homme voit au fond
de la souffrance, aussi profondément qu'il voit au fond de la vie.

Le courage cependant est le meilleur des meurtriers, le courage qui
attaque: il finira par tuer la mort, car il dit: "Comment? était-ce là
la vie? Allons! Recommençons encore une fois!"

Dans une telle maxime, il y a beaucoup de fanfare. Que celui qui a des
oreilles entende. -


2.


"Arrête-toi! nain! dis-je. Moi ou bien toi! Mais moi je suis le plus
fort de nous deux -: tu ne connais pas ma pensée la plus profonde!
_Celle-là_ tu ne saurais la porter!" -

Alors arriva ce qui me rendit plus léger: le nain sauta de mes épaules,
l'indiscret! Il s'accroupit sur une pierre devant moi. Mais à
l'endroit où nous nous arrêtions se trouvait comme par hasard un
portique.

"Vois ce portique! nain! repris-je: il a deux visages. Deux chemins se
réunissent ici: personne encore ne les a suivis jusqu'au bout.

Cette longue rue qui descend, cette rue se prolonge durant une éternité
et cette longue rue qui monte - c'est une autre éternité.

Ces chemins se contredisent, ils se butent l'un contre l'autre: - et
c'est ici, à ce portique, qu'ils se rencontrent. Le nom du portique se
trouve inscrit à un fronton, il s'appelle "instant".

Mais si quelqu'un suivait l'un de ces chemins - en allant toujours plus
loin: crois-tu nain, que ces chemins seraient en contradiction!" -

"Tout ce qui est droit ment, murmura le nain avec mépris. Toute vérité
est courbée, te temps lui-même est un cercle."

"Esprit de la lourdeur! dis-je avec colère, ne prends pas la chose trop
à la légère! Ou bien je te laisse là, pied-bot - et n'oublie pas que
c'est moi qui t'ai porté _là-haut!_

Considère cet instant! repris-je.

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Text Comparison with The Dawn of Day

Page 0
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Page 7
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Page 51
g.
Page 90
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" 209.
Page 171
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Page 187
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Page 198
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Page 204
It was Socrates who discovered another charm, that of cause and effect, of reason and sequence, and we moderns have become so used to it, and have been brought up to the necessity of logic that we look upon it as the normal taste, and as such it cannot but be repugnant to ardent and presumptuous people.
Page 206
No one doubted that it was possible to reach the goal of knowledge after the manner of Alexander or Columbus, and to settle all questions with one answer.
Page 216
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